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AAP and Delaying Solids Siempre Bella Due February 1; 1 child; California 2534 posts
14th Jun '10

Everyone says delay delay delay
JW if anyone can show me something from AAP that says delay solids :)



This is what I found

http://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/feeding-nutrition/pages/Switching-To-Solid-Foods.aspx



4-6 monts is all I can find
Article is only 6 days old....
Help me out


(link is updated last one didnt work)

user banned 4 kids; Texas 18242 posts
14th Jun '10

I am not sure it says to delay, I do know that almost everything says 4-6 months, but that babies CAN go a year with nothing....

Mama Rice 34 kids; North Las Vegas, Nevada 11980 posts
14th Jun '10
Quoting SDeezyBeezy:
Siempre Bella Due February 1; 1 child; California 2534 posts
14th Jun '10
Quoting iLaugh @ Stupid People:
Siempre Bella Due February 1; 1 child; California 2534 posts
14th Jun '10
Quoting rosamor *ebfb.*:
.._______.. Peru 47222 posts
14th Jun '10

Also, check out the delaying solids thread. The OP has a ton of info on it...I mean, a ton!



http://forum.baby-gaga.com/about840283.html

Stephloveslynden Due August 2 (boy); 2 kids; 1 angel baby; California 24423 posts
14th Jun '10

This is the OP of a thread for delaying solids:
http://forum.baby-gaga.com/about840283.html



The following organizations recommend that all babies be exclusively breastfed (no cereal, juice or any other foods) or formula fed if need be for the first 6 months of life (notthe first 4-6 months):




(all the above links can be clicked to take you to the corresponding info from that organization)



Most babies will become developmentally and physiologically ready to eat solids by 6-9 months of age. For some babies, delaying solids longer than six months can be a good thing; for example, some doctors may recommend delaying solids for 12 months if there is a family history of allergies.



*REASONS FOR DELAYING SOLIDS*
Although some of the reasons listed here assume that your baby is breastfed or fed breastmilk only,experts recommend that solids be delayed for formula fed babies also.



  • Delaying solids gives baby greater protection from illness.
    Although babies continue to receive many immunities from breastmilk for as long as they nurse, thegreatestimmunity occurs while a baby isexclusively breastfed. Breastmilk contains50+ known immune factors, and probably many more that are still unknown. One study has shown that babies who were exclusively breastfed for 4+ months had 40% fewer ear infections than breastfed babies whose diets were supplemented with other foods. The probability of respiratory illness occurring at any time during childhood is significantly reduced if the child is fed exclusively breast milk for at least 15 weeks and no solid foods are introduced during this time. (Wilson, 1998) Many other studies have also linked the degree of exclusivity of breastfeeding to enhanced health benefits (seeImmune factors in human milkandRisks of Artificial Feeding).
  • Delaying solids gives baby's digestive system time to mature.
    If solids are started before a baby's system is ready to handle them, they are poorly digested and may cause unpleasant reactions (digestive upset, gas, constipation, etc.). Protein digestion is incomplete in infancy. Gastric acid and pepsin are secreted at birth and increase toward adult values over the following 3 to 4 months. The pancreatic enzyme amylase does not reach adequate levels for digestion of starches until around 6 months, and carbohydrate enzymes such as maltase, isomaltase, and sucrase do not reach adult levels until around 7 months. Young infants also have low levels of lipase and bile salts, so fat digestion does not reach adult levels until 6-9 months.



  • Delaying solids decreases the risk of food allergies.
    It is well documented that prolonged exclusive breastfeeding results in a lower incidence of food allergies (seeAllergy ReferencesandRisks of Artificial Feeding). From birth until somewhere between four and six months of age, babies possess what is often referred to as an"open gut."opengut.gifThis means that the spaces between the cells of the small intestines will readily allow intact macromolecules, including whole proteins and pathogens, to pass directly into the bloodstream.This is great for your breastfed baby as it allows beneficial antibodies in breastmilk to pass more directly into baby's bloodstream, but it also means that large proteins fromotherfoods (which may predispose baby to allergies) and disease-causing pathogens can pass right through, too. During baby's first 4-6 months, while the gut is still "open," antibodies (sIgA) from breastmilk coat baby's digestive tract and providepassiveimmunity, reducing the likelihood of illness and allergic reactions before gut closure occurs. Baby starts producing these antibodies on his own at around 6 months, and gut closure should have occurred by this time also. SeeHow Breast Milk Protects NewbornsandThe Case for the Virgin Gutfor more on this subject.



  • Delaying solids helps to protect baby from iron-deficiency anemia.
    The introduction of iron supplements and iron-fortified foods, particularly during the first six months, reduces the efficiency of baby's iron absorption. Healthy, full-term infants who are breastfed exclusively for periods of 6-9 months have been shown to maintain normal hemoglobin values and normal iron stores. In one study (Pisacane, 1995), the researchers concluded that babies who were exclusively breastfed for 7 months (and were not give iron supplements or iron-fortified cereals) had significantly higher hemoglobin levels at one year than breastfed babies who received solid foods earlier than seven months. The researchers foundnocases of anemia within the first year in babies breastfed exclusively for seven months and concluded that breastfeeding exclusively for seven months reduces the risk of anemia. SeeIs Iron-Supplementation Necessary?for more information.



  • Delaying solids helps to protect baby from future obesity.
    The early introduction of solids is associated with increased body fat and weight in childhood. (for example, seeWilson 1998,von Kries 1999,Kalies 2005)
  • Delaying solids helps mom to maintain her milk supply.
    Studies have shown that for a young baby solidsreplacemilk in a baby's diet - they do not add to baby's total intake. The more solids that baby eats, the less milk he takes from mom, and less milk taken from mom means less milk production. Babies who eat lots of solids or who start solids early tend to wean prematurely.
  • Delaying solids helps to space babies.
    Breastfeeding is most effective inpreventing pregnancywhen your baby is exclusively breastfed and all of his nutritional and s*****g needs are satisfied at the breast.
  • Delaying solids makes starting solids easier.
    Babies who start solids later can feed themselves and are not as likely to have allergic reactions to foods.


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Signs that indicate baby is developmentally ready for solids (baby should have most if not all):

*Baby can sit up well without support.
*Baby has lost the tongue-thrust reflex and does not automatically push solids out of his mouth with his tongue.
*Baby is ready and willing to chew.
*Baby is developing a

.._______.. Peru 47222 posts
14th Jun '10
Quoting SDeezyBeezy:
Siempre Bella Due February 1; 1 child; California 2534 posts
14th Jun '10
Quoting Steph♥Alice +1:
Siempre Bella Due February 1; 1 child; California 2534 posts
14th Jun '10
Quoting rosamor *ebfb.*:
user banned 4 kids; Texas 18242 posts
14th Jun '10
Quoting SDeezyBeezy:
user banned 4 kids; Texas 18242 posts
14th Jun '10
Quoting Steph♥Alice +1:
Siempre Bella Due February 1; 1 child; California 2534 posts
14th Jun '10
Quoting iLaugh @ Stupid People:
user banned 4 kids; Texas 18242 posts
14th Jun '10
Quoting SDeezyBeezy: