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Femur Length LIZmom2twins 2 kids; Kansas 1957 posts
12th Jul '10

Ok so I have a ? has anyone ever had their babies measure behind- femur length wise? For example the head and other things were measuring on time but femur length was short. TIA

Mrs. Benjamin 2 kids; Molalla, Oregon 1240 posts
12th Jul '10

All 3 measurements from my baby are measuring small... but they are concerned with his abdomen more than his femur. I'd say femur is the best one to be measuring behind :) I'm no help, just encouragement!

Booperelli 2 kids; Eaton Rapids, Michigan 8 posts
12th Jul '10

4444's femurs measured behind!

LIZmom2twins 2 kids; Kansas 1957 posts
12th Jul '10
Quoting Miss.:
Vincent&Me (Laura) 2 kids; Moab, Utah 7847 posts
12th Jul '10

I just had an ultrasound on Friday. My little girl's femurs are measuring about a week behind, and her abdomen was measuring two weeks behind. But the doctor said that since they're pretty close, it's nothing to be concerned about.



How far behind are they measuring?

LIZmom2twins 2 kids; Kansas 1957 posts
12th Jul '10
Quoting Booperelli:
Booperelli 2 kids; Eaton Rapids, Michigan 8 posts
12th Jul '10
Quoting LIZsoon2BMOMMYtoTWINS:
einahpetS +4 4 kids; Colorado 20822 posts
12th Jul '10

Yes, my last pregnancy big time...



It started off with the initial diagnosis at 18 weeks, they were off by just a few days, ultrasounds every two weeks I watched them continue to grow, but stay very small...by week 39 the femur length was 6 weeks behind and the humerus length was 5 weeks behind.



To make a lonnnngggg story short....turns out it is just genetic for my husband and myself because we are not tall people (me 5'6", he 5'8"). My son was born, not only was he, thank God, perfectly healthy, but he was also my longest birth length baby.



This pregnancy also has femur/humerus on the shorter length, but I'm not even stressing about it at all. It is normal for me.

Vincent&Me (Laura) 2 kids; Moab, Utah 7847 posts
12th Jul '10
Quoting LIZsoon2BMOMMYtoTWINS:
LIZmom2twins 2 kids; Kansas 1957 posts
12th Jul '10
Quoting Vincent&Me (Laura):
LIZmom2twins 2 kids; Kansas 1957 posts
12th Jul '10
Quoting Booperelli:
Booperelli 2 kids; Eaton Rapids, Michigan 8 posts
12th Jul '10
Quoting LIZsoon2BMOMMYtoTWINS:
Vincent&Me (Laura) 2 kids; Moab, Utah 7847 posts
12th Jul '10
Quoting LIZsoon2BMOMMYtoTWINS:
LIZmom2twins 2 kids; Kansas 1957 posts
12th Jul '10
Quoting Booperelli:
staciasmommy10*01*07 3 kids; Pennsylvania 1455 posts
12th Jul '10

IUGR...i had the with my twins..their tummy were measuring small !



Intrauterine Growth Restriction




Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a common diagnosis in obstetrics and carries an increased risk of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Identification of IUGR is crucial because proper evaluation and management can result in a favorable outcome. Certain pregnancies are at high risk for growth restriction, although a substantial percentage of cases occur in the general obstetric population. Accurate dating early in pregnancy is essential for a diagnosis of IUGR. Ultrasound biometry is the gold standard for assessment of fetal size and the amount of amniotic fluid. Growth restriction is classified as symmetric and asymmetric. A lag in fundal height of 4 cm or more suggests IUGR. Serial ultrasonograms are important for monitoring growth restriction, and management must be individualized. General management measures include treatment of maternal disease, good nutrition and institution of bed rest. Preterm delivery is indicated if the fetus shows evidence of abnormal function on biophysical profile testing. The fetus should be monitored continuously during labor to minimize fetal hypoxia.


Fetal growth is dependent on genetic, placental and maternal factors. The fetus is thought to have an inherent growth potential that, under normal circumstances, yields a healthy newborn of appropriate size. The maternal-placental-fetal units act in harmony to provide the needs of the fetus while supporting the physiologic changes of the mother. Limitation of growth potential in the fetus is analogous to failure to thrive in the infant. The causes of both can be intrinsic or environmental.



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While most fetuses with IUGR are constitutionally small and otherwise healthy, an aggressive search for factors known to cause IUGR should be undertaken.
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Fetal growth restriction is the second leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, followed only by prematurity.1,2 The incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is estimated to be approximately 5 percent in the general obstetric population.3 However, the incidence varies depending on the population under examination (including its geographic location) and the standard growth curves used as reference.4 In assessing perinatal outcome by weight, infants who weigh less than 2,500 g (5 lb, 8 oz) at term have a perinatal mortality rate that is five to 30 times greater than that of infants whose birth weights are at the 50th percentile.5 The mortality rate is 70 to 100 times higher in infants who weigh less than 1,500 g (3 lb, 5 oz).5 Perinatal asphyxia involving multiple organ systems is one of the most significant problems in growth-restricted infants.3
Timely diagnosis and management of IUGR is one of the major achievements in contemporary obstetrics. If the growth-restricted fetus is identified and appropriate management instituted, perinatal mortality can be reduced,6,7 underscoring the need for assessment of fetal growth at each prenatal visit.



http://www.aafp.org/afp/980800ap/peleg.html