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How does this usually work? Emily Ann Anita Sobczyk 1 child; Hampshire, Illinois 115 posts
26th Sep '12

I plan on pumping for a majority of daily feedings rather than breast feeding when the baby is born as well as doing some formula for convenience at times. I know when you give birth in the hospital that they ask you what you plan on doing for feeding purposes while you stay.



*At this point what would I tell them?
*Would I bring my own breast pumps with me?
*Do they supply breast pumps temporarily?
*Or should I just tell them formula feedings?



I really would prefer starting right away with giving my child breast milk especially because of oxytocin being present which will help create a stronger "bond" and not to mention the better nutritional value as well.



Any advice or insight?

1inpink2inblue Switzerland 11952 posts
26th Sep '12

Why not just breastfeed?

Ravey Candyass 2 kids; 1 angel baby; Boston, Massachusetts 103128 posts
26th Sep '12

If you want to breastfeed, don't pump until 6 weeks and formula will decrease your supply

Jennybananna 2 kids; Gilbert, AZ, United States 25079 posts
26th Sep '12

Formula is not need trust me it is far from a convenience (I say this after FF my oldest and primarily BF my second.) Just breastfeed pumping is exhausted and hard work.

Zbornak 1 child; Moncton, New Brunswick 2688 posts
26th Sep '12

Honestly, if you are able, it would be best to put baby to your breast to start, to build your supply up. From what I've read, pumping from day one is quite difficult.



If that isn't an option I would tell the hospital your plans. You should avoid formula as much as possible in the beginning, so tell them you want to give pumped Breastmilk only. I don't know about pumps and if they supply them.

Roo & Sophie's mama 2 kids; Denton, Texas 9318 posts
26th Sep '12

formula feeding is not easier trust me I FF my first and BF my second. BF is 1000% easier especially in the middle of the night.

LA REINA™ Chicago, IL, United States 15863 posts
26th Sep '12
Quoting Ravey Candyass:" If you want to breastfeed, don't pump until 6 weeks and formula will decrease your supply"

:!:

_______Nope_________ 23772 posts
26th Sep '12

You'll probably need to either formula feed or breastfeed at first. Pumping is hard, and the first stuff you get is REALLY thick. It doesn't really go into a bottle easily. Also, it's not easy at all to get a full supply just by pumping. I know, I pumped exclusively for 3 months or so until my supply dried up.



Is there a reason you are not wanting to BF directly? If not, you'll probably have to supplement. Not being rude or discouraging, but I find most women just can't keep a fully supply when pumping.



*IF* you want it to work, you need to pump ever 2-3 hours (preferably 2), the more pumping the better. This includes at night, even if your baby is sleeping. You need to get up and pump. This SUCKS if you have to feed them too. You'll get almost no sleep and it's horrible, haha. Keep well hydrated. It's hard work!

♥MamaToSilas♥ 1 child; Illinois 9281 posts
26th Sep '12
Quoting she nan igans:" You'll probably need to either formula feed or breastfeed at first. Pumping is hard, and the first stuff ... [snip!] ... SUCKS if you have to feed them too. You'll get almost no sleep and it's horrible, haha. Keep well hydrated. It's hard work!"


My friend went through something similar. She tried so hard to exclusively pump and ended up losing her supply all together. She said it was a very exhausting experience and now formula feeds.

_______Nope_________ 23772 posts
26th Sep '12
Quoting Sami&Baby Silas:" My friend went through something similar. She tried so hard to exclusively pump and ended up losing her supply all together. She said it was a very exhausting experience and now formula feeds."


It is, and I didn't even have a baby to care for. I HAD to do it. Preemie who was in the NICU. Even so, pumping every 2 hours was so hard. Once the baby was home it was to tiring too. I'd wake up, and it took 45 minutes or so to pump between actually pumping, cleaning, storing the milk, all of that. Then another 45 minutes or so actually feeding the baby, changing, getting her back to sleep, and up again about 30 minutes later to pump again.



It's just that the pump (I had a hospital grade one that Ir ented) isn't as good as a baby. The body makes less and less because the pump isn't that efficient at emptying the breast, so the body thinks that the baby doesn't need as much milk. It was really heartbreaking because I tried so hard.

Emily Ann Anita Sobczyk 1 child; Hampshire, Illinois 115 posts
26th Sep '12
Quoting she nan igans:" It is, and I didn't even have a baby to care for. I HAD to do it. Preemie who was in the NICU. Even ... [snip!] ... the breast, so the body thinks that the baby doesn't need as much milk. It was really heartbreaking because I tried so hard."

Wow, I didn't realize that it was actually so much more different and difficult than just breast feeding.. This is my first kid so I didn't really know much about these kinds of things. I was actually just going to formula feed originally because I am just for some reason not very comfortable with the idea of breast feeding. I try to reason with myself hence why I decided to go with the whole pumping method because at least that way I am not jipping my child out of better nutrients. Lol now I just don't know what to do!

Jennybananna 2 kids; Gilbert, AZ, United States 25079 posts
26th Sep '12
Quoting Emily Ann Anita Sobczyk:" Wow, I didn't realize that it was actually so much more different and difficult than just breast feeding.. ... [snip!] ... method because at least that way I am not jipping my child out of better nutrients. Lol now I just don't know what to do!"

What is it that makes you uncomfortable with breastfeeding? Trying to address those issues might make it easier for you to try nursing. Also I know plenty of women who thought it was "gross or would be weird" until they had their baby and did it. I think a lot of the uncomfortableness goes away once you have the baby. They naturally root to find your breast and some will just latch right on with little to no help. It natural to them.

♥MamaToSilas♥ 1 child; Illinois 9281 posts
26th Sep '12
Quoting Emily Ann Anita Sobczyk:" Wow, I didn't realize that it was actually so much more different and difficult than just breast feeding.. ... [snip!] ... method because at least that way I am not jipping my child out of better nutrients. Lol now I just don't know what to do!"


Do whatever you're comfortable with. You won't be jipping your child if you don't breastfeed. Your child is being fed either way. My son is formula fed. I medically couldn't breastfeed. I felt guilty at first but I have a healthy chubby baby haha.

Zbornak 1 child; Moncton, New Brunswick 2688 posts
26th Sep '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting Emily Ann Anita Sobczyk:</b>" Wow, I didn't realize that it was actually so much more different and difficult than just breast feeding.. ... [snip!] ... method because at least that way I am not jipping my child out of better nutrients. Lol now I just don't know what to do!"</blockquote>




You might feel differently about it once you try it. :) just keep an open mind, give it a try, and if it doesn't work out there is always formula.

_______Nope_________ 23772 posts
26th Sep '12
Quoting Emily Ann Anita Sobczyk:" Wow, I didn't realize that it was actually so much more different and difficult than just breast feeding.. ... [snip!] ... method because at least that way I am not jipping my child out of better nutrients. Lol now I just don't know what to do!"


It's totally up to you. Personally? I'd give nursing a shot. I didn't think I'd be comfortable with it, but once I did (I got to breastfeed my 2nd) it was no big deal at all. Not weird or anything. And SO MUCH easier then formula feeding. Seriously. Making bottles at 2am SUCKS even if it's formula. Making bottles, warming it all up, it's no fun. It is much easier IMO to breastfeed. You don't have to stick with it, but you'll be glad you at least gave it a try.