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mamaluvsher4babies 36 kids; California 4230 posts
1st Nov '12

Its a good idea. When my nephew was 4 our postal man was black. When my nephew saw him he said He said "auntie look at him hes black!! ..I said''what are you talking about your black also!! Hes black/white. Thing is he has seen many black people was kind of weird.

user banned 2 kids; Minnesota 7318 posts
1st Nov '12
Quoting PeanutButter*superkink*:" i dont think its a bad thing,its good to teach kids about differences i cant count how many times ive ... [snip!] ... parents apologize to me for their kids asking questions i think its good for kids to learn about all the differences of people"


Do you personally mind when kids ask you those questions? I always assume I should let the person answer when my daughter asks strangers questions about their appearance because they can explain better than me. If they act annoyed I don't let her keep pestering but if they are ok answering I let them have a short conversation.

Supafly★ 2 kids; Poland 14109 posts
1st Nov '12

I don't think drawing attention to differences is ever a good idea. How are we supposed to teach kids that all humans are equal when we point out how different this race is from that one? They have eyes, they can see if someone looks different from them.

TheNuge 1 child; Pennsylvania 23130 posts
1st Nov '12

I think it's good to be open about differences and embrace them as something that makes the world "go around" and makes the world interesting.
It's a good discussion to have. My friend is white and has 2 white girls. She adopted a black boy and he was thrilled to go to a playground and see "people like me" at the age of barely 3. NOT haivng healthy, positive conversations creates too many questions and potential negative feelings.

user banned 2 kids; Minnesota 7318 posts
1st Nov '12
Quoting TheNuge:" I think it's good to be open about differences and embrace them as something that makes the world "go ... [snip!] ... at the age of barely 3. NOT haivng healthy, positive conversations creates too many questions and potential negative feelings."


Aw that is kinda sad he felt so different.

Crystallized Due February 24; 1 child; California 431 posts
1st Nov '12

I don't see it as an issue. Our differences make us who we are and shouldn't be seen as something that needs to be ignored.



IMO, ignoring it sends the message that somehow those differences are a bad thing.

Chibs 2 kids; Missouri 12147 posts
1st Nov '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting Chim Richalds:</b>" Do you personally mind when kids ask you those questions? I always assume I should let the person answer ... [snip!] ... than me. If they act annoyed I don't let her keep pestering but if they are ok answering I let them have a short conversation."</blockquote>




No not at all.
I enjoy teaching kids about it,except when they ask me why.its hard to explain to kids why it happened and still not scare them

. , Richmond, VA, United States 74925 posts
1st Nov '12
Quoting Chim Richalds:" I turned on Barney for my daughter yesterday, and they were talking about how everyone was special, regardless ... [snip!] ... they have good intentions but I can't help but think if we didn't teach these things, people wouldn't care nearly as much."

I kind of feel the same way.

Turd Ferguson Bangkok, Thailand 4583 posts
2nd Nov '12
Quoting Danielle: Jack&Basil'sMom:" I think if my niece had been positively and gently introduced to people's differences, she wouldn't go around asking people why they are brown and whatnot."


My son says he is afraid of 'brown people'. I feel like a jackass in public. He also is on the autism spectrum so sometimes there is no telling why he thinks the way he does. No matter how I have explained to him that skin color doesn't dictate whether or not someone is a 'bad guy' he doesn't get it.



OP I know what you are saying, however I can also see how a show like that could be beneficial.