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Cast Your Vote:

    • Yes, it's still a democracy -- Votes: 3
    • No, it's not. -- Votes: 33
    • Other. -- Votes: 1
taking a look at life Palm beach gardens, FL, United States 49151 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting iLL-Legal Alien:" But from has been said in this thread, and if I'm understanding correctly...with the Electoral College ... [snip!] ... get to choose the president? There's 538 people in the electoral collage. so that's 538 people choosing for the whole US?"



yep basically

user banned 1 child; Nunya, CA, United States 6369 posts
5th Nov '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting iLL-Legal Alien:</b>" But from has been said in this thread, and if I'm understanding correctly...with the Electoral College ... [snip!] ... get to choose the president? There's 538 people in the electoral collage. so that's 538 people choosing for the whole US?"</blockquote>




No. 538 don't pick the president.



Romney and Obama are on the ballot because in the primary, that is who people voted for to BE on the ballot.



We all cast 2 votes. In my opinion, many people don't seem to understand what those votes do.



People don't vote in the primary (which is where a nomination comes from) and then are appalled at the terrible choice(s) that they have on the general election day. What is there to complain about, really? These people were nominated by VOTES. I know a TON of people that don't even vote in the primary and then whine and complain when we end up with two sub-par choices.



Voting in the primary is KEY. It's only AFTER this first vote that the choices whittle down and then you* are limited to who the nominees are.

user banned 1 child; Nunya, CA, United States 6369 posts
5th Nov '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting Click Me Click Me!!!:</b>" yep basically "</blockquote>




This is absolutely false.

The Doctor 2 kids; Whiskey Dick Mountain, WA, United States 59959 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting iLL-Legal Alien:" But from has been said in this thread, and if I'm understanding correctly...with the Electoral College ... [snip!] ... get to choose the president? There's 538 people in the electoral collage. so that's 538 people choosing for the whole US?"


Each state has a set number of people in the electoral college. For most states, whichever candidate wins that state gets ALL of that state's electoral votes.

SpaceCowgirl Due December 21; 3 kids; Oregon 20240 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting iLL-Legal Alien:" But from has been said in this thread, and if I'm understanding correctly...with the Electoral College ... [snip!] ... get to choose the president? There's 538 people in the electoral collage. so that's 538 people choosing for the whole US?"


They vote based on who their state votes for, though.



The last time an electoral vote went to someone that the state didn't vote for was in the 1800s, I believe.

iLL-Legal Unicorn Alien 3 kids; New York, TX, United States 37137 posts
5th Nov '12

So where does the whole "they don't have to vote for who the people voted for" comes into play?
Do they have to go with what the majority of their state chose?




I'm so confused.




I need a whole class about this. LOL

SpaceCowgirl Due December 21; 3 kids; Oregon 20240 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting iLL-Legal Alien:" So where does the whole "they don't have to vote for who the people voted for" comes into play? Do they ... [snip!] ... Do they have to go with what the majority of their state chose? I'm so confused. I need a whole class about this. LOL"


I don't think they have to, but they pretty much always do.

taking a look at life Palm beach gardens, FL, United States 49151 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting SpaceCowgirl:" I don't think they have to, but they pretty much always do."


the dont have too....

624582 Neilton, Washington 9312 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting iLL-Legal Alien:" So where does the whole "they don't have to vote for who the people voted for" comes into play? Do they ... [snip!] ... Do they have to go with what the majority of their state chose? I'm so confused. I need a whole class about this. LOL"


I believe some states are legally obligated to go along with the popular vote, but even then I think if they voted against there is only a small fine and no real repercussions. I don't believe my state, Texas, is legally obligated to vote in favor of popular vote.



Perhaps I am just being over dramatic or I just do not know what I am talking about, but that alone makes me feel like my single vote truly doesn't matter as much as the media loves to portray. The voting guilt is getting a tad ridiculous on my live feed right now, I just can't wait until tomorrow is over.

iLL-Legal Unicorn Alien 3 kids; New York, TX, United States 37137 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting 624582:" I believe some states are legally obligated to go along with the popular vote, but even then I think ... [snip!] ... to portray. The voting guilt is getting a tad ridiculous on my live feed right now, I just can't wait until tomorrow is over."


This is how I'm feeling too LOL

user banned 1 child; Nunya, CA, United States 6369 posts
5th Nov '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting 624582:</b>" I believe some states are legally obligated to go along with the popular vote, but even then I think ... [snip!] ... to portray. The voting guilt is getting a tad ridiculous on my live feed right now, I just can't wait until tomorrow is over."</blockquote>



Who did you vote for in the primary election?

user banned 1 child; Nunya, CA, United States 6369 posts
5th Nov '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting iLL-Legal Alien:</b>" So where does the whole "they don't have to vote for who the people voted for" comes into play? Do they ... [snip!] ... Do they have to go with what the majority of their state chose? I'm so confused. I need a whole class about this. LOL"</blockquote>




I have been in a constitutional study group for almost a year.



I didn't know almost anything but the very basic civic type stuff, when I started.



Each state has an electorate. In the primaries, that state, BY MAJORITY VOTE, nominates who they wish, to represent their party in the general election. The popular vote wins in that race.



What we are doing in the primary, is telling our state's electorate who we want to nominate and see on the ballot for the general election.



Come the general election, where we elect a president, not just nominate someone to run, we all, by popular vote (again), choose between the 2 nominated candidates.



The primary is the time for our individual votes to count most. It is those individual votes that decide who we want to lead us. The general election is where all of those individual votes are translated into electoral votes.



I hope I said that well enough to more easily understand.

624582 Neilton, Washington 9312 posts
5th Nov '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting ~Julie Blue Eyes~:</b>" <blockquote><b>Quoting 624582:</b>" I believe some states are legally obligated to ... [snip!] ... feed right now, I just can't wait until tomorrow is over."</blockquote> Who did you vote for in the primary election?"</blockquote>




No one, I'm not registered in Texas.

Dovahkiin 1 child; 1 angel baby; Kentucky 16776 posts
5th Nov '12

No, it's not a democracy. It's actually called a constitutional republic. A true democracy would honor every individual vote.

taking a look at life Palm beach gardens, FL, United States 49151 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting ~Julie Blue Eyes~:" <blockquote><b>Quoting iLL-Legal Alien:</b>" So where does the whole "they don't have ... [snip!] ... all of those individual votes are translated into electoral votes. I hope I said that well enough to more easily understand."


u know theres more then 2 people running right?