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Commander Shepard 18 kids; Jacksonville, Florida 6447 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting Mama Lizzy :]:" <blockquote><b>Quoting Commander Shepard:</b>" I have no opinion or fact based on this ... [snip!] ... are SO many interventions done its rediculous... I will be having a Vbav next time with a midwife in a birth center or at home"


I am military and high risk. Tricare is pretty set on me staying at the hospital here. When I was induced with DD, it was at 36 weeks due to low amniotic fluid.



On the subject of refusing a c-section, I told them no. They told me if I didn't have her within the next hour, they wanted to do a c-section. She was born 45 mins after that.

Mama Lizzy :] 1 child; Texas 5575 posts
5th Nov '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting Ole' No Name:</b>" I was due on December 28th and my Doctor was really pushing for an induction. I had no complications ... [snip!] ... :) He did give me pitocin to speed my labor up but that was all. Some women don't know they can refuse induction and c section."</blockquote>



So f**king lame! My son was due on Thanksgiving....pretty sure that's why I was " too small to give birth without risking C-section"

_______Nope_________ 23772 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting Rabbit
Mama Lizzy :] 1 child; Texas 5575 posts
5th Nov '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting Commander Shepard:</b>" I am military and high risk. Tricare is pretty set on me staying at the hospital here. When I was induced ... [snip!] ... no. They told me if I didn't have her within the next hour, they wanted to do a c-section. She was born 45 mins after that."</blockquote>




Wow that was close! Glad you didn't need a C! My induction actually led to my c-section.



You can always switch OB's and hospitals...and/or find a Doula to be your advocate for your birth plan while you are laboring

r a b b i t ™ 1 child; Wildcat stuck in the Cards-nation, KY, United States 27518 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting she nan igans:" I think a lot of women also like to b***h about Dr's pushing their beliefs on them, but are not quick ... [snip!] ... rather have their babies at 37 weeks then go overdue. Dr's don't see a problem with it, so do it. I think it's both issues."


Ob I agree.
My OB told me flat out I have to have a c-section again and if I refuse it's considered abuse and medical neglect here. I dunno how true that is, I can't find a clear answer but it's a terrifying thought nonetheless. Makes me wonder how many women are told this or given the impression that they cannot refuse

KissMeFinnNelson<3 1 child; 2 angel babies; Glasgow, Scotland, UK, United Kingdom 5359 posts
5th Nov '12

I think it's a mixture of convenience, lawsuit/sue culture America has and also the fact the healthcare in America is sadly a customer and sales environment that is about $$$$.



Being born in the UK, living here myself, having given birth here and seen many of my family and friends give birth here I always find it quite fascinating to watch American birth programmes. I mean I have literally seen a woman be scheduled for delivery before 40 weeks because her Dr will be out of town, because she is uncomfortable, I've seen a Dr tell a woman he thinks she should have a c section because she has been in labour for 10 hours and nothing has happened yet and I also see women think their only option of pain relief is an epidural. I mean things like that I see and my jaw just hits the floor but it is just a different culture, I know a woman had her first baby in her home country Netherlands and her second baby here in the UK and she couldn't understand our excessive and intrusive view of birth but yet compare our UK birthing to Americas and America's is off the scale so I couldn't imagine what she would think if she moved over haha



My personal experience of birth here in the UK is being 20 years old with my first child, my water breaking after having a full night of what I thought was Braxton hicks and phoning hospital. Was told to stay at home for as long as I could and take some standard over the counter painkillers. Going up to hospital, being checked over and going through the motions of gas and air, then having pethedine, then eventually an epidural because by that point I had been awake for 3 days straight in labour and they told me I needed some sleep and energy before I was fully dilated to push. Managed a few hours sleep, woke up and had couple more cm's to dilate, eventually fully dilated, pushed for exactly 20 minutes and that was it. I tore a little bit and that was me haha I was perfectly fine so was my son, my tear was tiny and healed very quickly and that was that. I mean that is pretty standard here, bo one gets induced unless they are one week last their due date and no one gets a c section unless it is absolutely needed. I get the feeling had I been in labour in America there is no way I would have been allowed to be in labour for 3 days, freely able to go through each method of pain relief as I wished and felt ready, been able to push with no intervention and able to tear naturally. I'm also thankful we have Midwives who look after us through pregnancy and birthing and that the Doctor is only on hand should they have to step in. I personally feel more comfortable in our system where we have a Midwife be in charge of our care, a woman or man who has been at University full time for 3-4 years specifically studying everything about pregnancy and birth and post natal care.

KissMeFinnNelson<3 1 child; 2 angel babies; Glasgow, Scotland, UK, United Kingdom 5359 posts
5th Nov '12

..... Just found the business of being born on Netflix so I'm going to watch it, shouod be interesting!!

Commander Shepard 18 kids; Jacksonville, Florida 6447 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting xTJ:" ..... Just found the business of being born on Netflix so I'm going to watch it, shouod be interesting!!"


I liked it because I love anything to do with ladies having babies. I personally thought the way the information was presented was a little bit bias, though. It really educated me in all the different interventions medical professionals use. the first time I saw it, I was in shock.

KissMeFinnNelson<3 1 child; 2 angel babies; Glasgow, Scotland, UK, United Kingdom 5359 posts
5th Nov '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting Commander Shepard:</b>" I liked it because I love anything to do with ladies having babies. I personally thought the way the ... [snip!] ... It really educated me in all the different interventions medical professionals use. the first time I saw it, I was in shock."</blockquote>



Well once I finish it I will let you know if they are being bias or if it is the truth and you guys are crazy lol!!

Commander Shepard 18 kids; Jacksonville, Florida 6447 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting xTJ:" <blockquote><b>Quoting Commander Shepard:</b>" I liked it because I love anything ... [snip!] ... Well once I finish it I will let you know if they are being bias or if it is the truth and you guys are crazy lol!!"


I do believe that it's crazy over here compared to everywhere else! Lol.

KissMeFinnNelson<3 1 child; 2 angel babies; Glasgow, Scotland, UK, United Kingdom 5359 posts
5th Nov '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting Commander Shepard:</b>" I do believe that it's crazy over here compared to everywhere else! Lol."</blockquote>




Ok I'm about 20 minutes in and some of the things are really disturbing me but just want to clear up if it's true or the programme is exaggerating?



That women are generally in the position of lying flat on their back and legs in the air, unaware that is one of the most unrecommended and hazardous position to give birth in and is mostly likely to result in interventions?



That an OB person who delivers maternity care is essentially a surgeon and has most likely never witnessed a regular birth?



That drugs such as pitocin, epidural are dished out like the first option and are fairly common?



It is quite common to use forceps, vacuum, to cut?

r a b b i t ™ 1 child; Wildcat stuck in the Cards-nation, KY, United States 27518 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting xTJ:" <blockquote><b>Quoting Commander Shepard:</b>" I do believe that it's crazy over here ... [snip!] ... epidural are dished out like the first option and are fairly common? It is quite common to use forceps, vacuum, to cut?"


Yes fir most of those. I don't get the one about OBs being surgeons though.

Commander Shepard 18 kids; Jacksonville, Florida 6447 posts
5th Nov '12
Quoting xTJ:" <blockquote><b>Quoting Commander Shepard:</b>" I do believe that it's crazy over here ... [snip!] ... epidural are dished out like the first option and are fairly common? It is quite common to use forceps, vacuum, to cut?"


Yes to all of that, except OB's never witnessing births. Though, they probably have very little experience witnessing completely natural births.



The way most hospitals present the drugs used in labor and delivery, from what I've seen on TV and experienced, is not like an option. They say "we are going to start the Pitocin now" or "we're going to go ahead and use Cervadil."
It doesn't feel like you have a choice when they say it this way and that's what disturbs me the most. And a lot of women are emotionally vulnerable, which gives the doctor the upper hand.

mamaluvsher4babies 36 kids; California 4230 posts
5th Nov '12

My Dr is old school tahts what I love about him. He doesnt do C sections unless it has to be done. I know some who stopped going to him because they wanted csections so they didnt have to go through labor. He said nope. he doesnt give epis unless they are needed. Meaning if a woman is dialted to 1 for 10 mins then screams for meds he wont do it. He is a very kind DR..he also doesnt do abortions. He will refer you out

KissMeFinnNelson<3 1 child; 2 angel babies; Glasgow, Scotland, UK, United Kingdom 5359 posts
5th Nov '12

Wow you guys replies have shocked and saddened me quite a bit. I mean by all means the UK is viewed by the rest of Europe as quite intrusive but if you compare the UK to America, America is off the freaking chart! :/ Makes me so thankful that in the UK no matter where you give birth whether it be at home, in hospital or wherever it is Midwives who are in charge of absolutely everything. Like I said Midwives here attend University for 3-4 years full time, explicitly studying pregnancy, birth and post natal care and they mist spend a certain amount of time in hospital delivering alongside fully qualified experienced Midwives before they can actually gain there qualification. I can't get my head around you guys aren't made aware of the most simple things like laying on your back with legs in the air is the most unrecomended birth positions that can itself cause complications and distress to baby, how incredibly distressing it is to use pitocin that is why births here are absolutely not induced until 41 weeks because of the risks and complications of can cause resulting in distress to your baby so you need interventions..... Hmmm I can see why America has such a high birth mortality rate compared to other developed countries. Made me aware of a serious issue I had no idea about. I mean here in the UK pain relief is on hand no problem, we can literally click your fingers and get an epidural, that is fine and quite the norm but yeah the rest is abhorrent to me. That women aren't aware of the most simple things such as the best positions or are given pitocin like it's nothing and unaware of how distressing it is to baby and the complications that can arise...... Urgh yeah it is actually highly upsetting how uninformed women seem to be and the high risks involved because of this :(