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How to encourage speech? Kayla: mommy of 2 (: 2 kids; Sachse, Texas 323 posts
28th Nov '12

My DD doesnt really say REAL words and she is almost 19 months. She babbles in her own language all the time, but her actual vocabulary could use some major work. The only words that she uses on a consisten basis are "momma, mommy" (but she calls everyone that...especially when she wants something hahaha) "baby", and "ball". That's it. She has said some words (I cant remember off of the top of my head), but she doesnt use them consistently. She does sing certain parts of the alphabet such as: "a,b,c....w,x", but im just worried because I feel like she is majorly behind :( Is there any certain activities where I could help her learn to communicate and grow her vocabulary?

username1 1 child; Chicopee, MA, United States 30921 posts
28th Nov '12

just point to everything and say what it is a few times... and she doesnt seem too behind most pedis dont worry too much til after they are 2

LittleTiger 2 kids; Florida 10764 posts
28th Nov '12

Read to her every day and buy some flash cards.



My husband and I play this game in the car where we pick a letter from the alphabet and then we take turns saying a word that starts with that letter. The first person who cant come up with a word during their turn loses. The winner gets to pick the next letter. Its a good way to build vocabulary for your little one and it helps stimulate you brain during those long hours of driving.

Lotusmama Due March 31; British Columbia 1672 posts
28th Nov '12

Talk, talk, talk, talk talk!

When you are cooking talk about what you are doing like you are narating a story "Mommy is chopping the carrots", "do you want a piece of carrot?" "Now it is time for the onions, can you pass mommy an onion?" Encourage any sort of communication she uses whether it is pointing, sign language, talking, or gestures. Keep asking her lots of questions. I've be talking with my daugher since long before she could actually say any workds :) Just keep chatting and she will join in when she can! Make sure to leave a little pause after a question.

When you are reading books together don't worry about reading the whole story. Let her turn the pages and ask her questions about what she sees. "Where is the monkey?" (then she points) "Yes! That is the monkey - the monkey is in the tree. Who else is in the tree?" (pause - no answer or maybe pointing) "The bird is in the tree."

Roe23 2 kids; Ottawa, Ontario 4199 posts
28th Nov '12

I was concerned about my son, he said a few more words then that at 2 years, but not many, well under the 100 words he was supposed to be saying (maybe 20 words, if that). And he had yet to put any two words together.



We were referred to pediatrician by our GP and he went over the developmental stuff with us. Our son is very good at the physical things. And he is great at asking for what he wants (I don't make him say the words, I just know what he is asking for). The pediatrician told us to come back in 6 months (at 2.5 year old) if we were still concerned.



Now, two months later, he is saying a lot more words, putting a few together and saying 'mine' as well as his name (his name is very difficult to say). I'm not as concerned anymore.



Around here we also have a program called "First Words" that is publicly funded. I kept thinking of taking my son there to be evaluated but between a death in the family and illnesses (colds mostly) in my house, I kept putting it off. Now it doesn't seem as important.



And talking to people around here, there is a book or program that can be very helpful, it's called "It Takes Two To Talk" or something like that. I never did look into it.



Sign language can also help, I borrowed some videos that were lots of fun for me and my daughter. My son was never really into the videos but did learn some of the signs, especially for 'more' and some food signs. It helped when he was frustrated that we didn't know what he wanted.

Kayla: mommy of 2 (: 2 kids; Sachse, Texas 323 posts
28th Nov '12
Quoting Roe23:" I was concerned about my son, he said a few more words then that at 2 years, but not many, well under ... [snip!] ... of the signs, especially for 'more' and some food signs. It helped when he was frustrated that we didn't know what he wanted."

Thank you so much! I would love for my DD and even my DS (who is currently 5 months) to learn sign language. I think it would be so helpful in situations where they dont know how to express themselves verbally.