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snglemama 4 kids; Georgia 11978 posts
20th Dec '12
Quoting GL♣05/08/2013:" <blockquote><b>Quoting snglemama:</b>" how would they KNOW if it's an emergency if ... [snip!] ... want a little belt around her stomach? insane"</blockquote> How do monitors relay if a baby is breech or stuck.?"


you should know before labor if baby is breech...



and "stuck"... depends on what you mean. If you're talking shoulder dystocia... it doesn't. but I find it funny that women want to rely on medical professionals to knwo what to do in certain circumstances.. but not others. Sometimes though.. baby just doesn't come down, and goes into distress from being there too long.... others can push for hours and be fine. How do we know the difference... the HEART RATE. if moms pushing for 2 hours and baby's heart rate is great... we're ok with it. If mom is pushing for 1 hour.. and baby's heart rate drops into the 70's... NOT ok. the little belt around the waste..... tells me if baby is alive, or is tolerating labor.

Maria + Cory = Alexis 17 kids; Middleport, Ohio 1075 posts
20th Dec '12

I should mention that I see a mid-wife instead of an actual OB. My mid-wife she set to deliver my baby unless a c-section is needed then the OB who performed my sisters three c-sections will step in. I have seen them both in action and feel confident that my doctor will do whatever is best for my child.

snglemama 4 kids; Georgia 11978 posts
20th Dec '12
Quoting Maria + Cory = Alexis:" My birth plan give my doctor the go ahead to do what she believes is best. I would never tell her what ... [snip!] ... feels I need a c-section than I am okay with it. I prefer certain things but in the end I give the final decision to my doctor."



sounds reasonable. Up to you really. Those are all things we'd ask at time of admission anyway. Dont' be afraid to stand up for yourself... but listen to the doctor as well.



contrary to what some here will believe.. I'm actually a HUGE advocate for patient's rights.... but get frustrated when moms come in thinking they know best. Question the doctor sure... but some things are done for a reason.. and monitoring baby..... that's a ridiculous thing to refuse.

snglemama 4 kids; Georgia 11978 posts
20th Dec '12
Quoting Masturkate TTC:" This sort of thought process from a nurse is exactly the reason women have miserable experiences in ... [snip!] ... that you seem to have no respect or even awareness of a mother's RIGHT to make her own decisions. Even in a hospital setting."


sorry.... but I'm actually an awesome nurse.. who will REFUSE a doctor who wants to start pitocin when unnecessary, and will tell the patients to tell their doctor no and why. BUT.. to go into it refusing to be monitored.. that just puts everyone involved at risk.



I'm pretty anti-intervention. but... monitoring is NOT intervention... and going into the hospital with no medical knowlege.. but wanting to tell the staff how to do their job is not ok with me. We;re not insensitive to the needs of the mom.. we simply want babies to be born alive.

MamaKate<3 TTC since Mar 2012; 2 kids; Ohio 16935 posts
20th Dec '12
Quoting snglemama:" sounds reasonable. Up to you really. Those are all things we'd ask at time of admission anyway. Dont' ... [snip!] ... the doctor sure... but some things are done for a reason.. and monitoring baby..... that's a ridiculous thing to refuse."


Most women's issues with monitors are that they are unreliable. They were introduced to decrease rates of cerebral palsy in the US but since then rates have actually gone up since the monitors can cause false concern that leads to otherwise unnecessary interventions that put mothers and babies at HIGHER risks. Also they restrict movement during labor which can easily inhibit labor. Lying on your back is a horrible position to be in while a fetus is trying to descend through the birth canal and subsequently while giving birth. Intermittent monitoring is a much more desirable option.

user banned 2 kids; New York 34017 posts
20th Dec '12
Quoting Blythe.:" why no heart monitor? "


it dug in with every contraction, and that hurt the most. i just want him checked every now and then.

Maria + Cory = Alexis 17 kids; Middleport, Ohio 1075 posts
20th Dec '12
Quoting snglemama:" sounds reasonable. Up to you really. Those are all things we'd ask at time of admission anyway. Dont' ... [snip!] ... the doctor sure... but some things are done for a reason.. and monitoring baby..... that's a ridiculous thing to refuse."

I do a lot of research and I talk to my doctor about the stuff I find. She gives me her input and she usually wins out in the end.



Plus I go through a program called Help Me Grow in which a representative comes to my house at least once a month. She and I discuss my pregnancy and the baby's development. We also discuss my research and what the doctor says. She also checks my home for any hazards. Once the baby comes she will come to gauge the baby's development and if I need help with anything she will be there. She is really great. Both my sisters went through the program and had her.

user banned 2 kids; New York 34017 posts
20th Dec '12
Quoting snglemama:" no monitor? why not deliver at home then? if they can't monitor baby why bother going to the hospital? ... [snip!] ... going to the hospital? did the doctor approve that one? I dont' think I'd agree to take a labor if I couldn't monitor baby"


yes, i told her i don't want to wear it all the time.

user banned 2 kids; New York 34017 posts
20th Dec '12
Quoting snglemama:" how would they KNOW if it's an emergency if there's no monitor on baby? I absolutely would refuse to ... [snip!] ... no clue how long it's been that way... because of a selfish mom who doesnt' want a little belt around her stomach? insane"


my first came out not breathing, and i had on a monitor the entire time. i think it was due to pitocin, which i had no idea i could refuse, or what it was really for. and i got to the hospital at 7 cm, so why they even bothered giving me that nasty shit is beyond me.



i also want to labor at home longer, if i can, as long as i'm not having any issues and my water isn't broken. there's no reason to go to the hospital right away, to be told i'm 3cm and turned away or something.

LoveMyBubbaBoy 2 kids; Michigan 3187 posts
20th Dec '12

I had more of a birth "goal"... I didn't want any meds or anything. But after 51hrs of back labor and only being at a 5 with no sleep, I got an epi. I was glad I didn't have a plan because it made it easier to roll with the punches. I wasn't as disappointed... :)

MamaKate<3 TTC since Mar 2012; 2 kids; Ohio 16935 posts
20th Dec '12
Quoting snglemama:" sorry.... but I'm actually an awesome nurse.. who will REFUSE a doctor who wants to start pitocin when ... [snip!] ... how to do their job is not ok with me. We;re not insensitive to the needs of the mom.. we simply want babies to be born alive."


Do you question women as to where they obtain their knowledge? How do you know where they developed their opinions and what gives anyone the right to decide whether another's source of information is valid? Birth shouldn't be a medical issue and I don't want the advice of a person who practices medicine when it pertains to pregnancy and birth and a lot of people feel similarly.

user banned 2 kids; New York 34017 posts
20th Dec '12
Quoting snglemama:" sorry.... but I'm actually an awesome nurse.. who will REFUSE a doctor who wants to start pitocin when ... [snip!] ... how to do their job is not ok with me. We;re not insensitive to the needs of the mom.. we simply want babies to be born alive."


i'm not telling anyone HOW to do their job. i said i don't want a fetal heart monitor on the whole time, that it just hurt with my first, and my doctor didn't argue at all, or act like it was far fetched and out of the question..



i have new doctors and am delivering in a different hospital this time because i wasn't happy with my first.

user banned 2 kids; New York 34017 posts
20th Dec '12

and i can't have a home birth due to $$. i'm on my dad's insurance, which doesn't cover dependent's pregnancy, so i have medicaid to supplement. i don't even know how much this is costing me to begin with..

Mom of Tristan/Rayah/Keat 3 kids; Alberta 2068 posts
20th Dec '12

<blockquote><b>Quoting snglemama:</b>" you should know before labor if baby is breech... and "stuck"... depends on what you mean. If you're ... [snip!] ... rate drops into the 70's... NOT ok. the little belt around the waste..... tells me if baby is alive, or is tolerating labor."</blockquote>




I agree with having monitors on when giving birth. That I will always do. If it wasn't or that monitor my eldest wouldn't be here today. Every time I pushed his heart rate dropped and as soon as I wasn't pushing he would go right back up the birth cannel. Heart rate wasn't coming back up after awhile and they had to get him out immediately. Didn't have time for a emergency c-section. Found out the cord was wrapped around his neck and would only get tighter with every push. So for that I wouldn't refuse a monitor that is very irresponsible of a mother to do such a thing.

user banned 2 kids; New York 34017 posts
20th Dec '12

"That said, if you have a low-risk pregnancy and no complications during labor, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists considers intermittent auscultation an acceptable method. And it's the preferred method of the American College of Nurse-Midwives for women with no risk factors since it's associated with fewer c-sections and forceps and vacuum deliveries, and there's no proof that it makes any difference for the babies.So if you're planning a natural childbirth and don't have any high-risk conditions, and you'd rather not be hooked up to a machine for the duration of your labor, discuss your preference with your practitioner."



My doctor said it was fine. & my doctor ranks over some girls on the internet.



if something is going wrong or my doctor feels i should wear one continuously, then i will. but i'd like to try and do without. i trust my doctor and will take their advice and knowledge first.