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*~*allykat*~* 1 child; Washington 891 posts
21st Jan '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting The Dandelion Rapist:</b>" How are they able to deny it, if he has been caught doing suspicious things ? Something just doesn't seem right. "</blockquote>




They just don't care.

The Dandelion Rapist 18 kids; New Mexico 6885 posts
21st Jan '13
Quoting *~*allykat*~*:" <blockquote><b>Quoting The Dandelion Rapist:</b>" How are they able to deny it, if ... [snip!] ... he has been caught doing suspicious things ? Something just doesn't seem right. "</blockquote> They just don't care."


I would recommend getting law enforcement involved then.



Seriously, if he is going to people's houses at midnight, have these people call the cops. He's trespassing.

TheNuge 1 child; Pennsylvania 22820 posts
21st Jan '13
Quoting *~*allykat*~*:" <blockquote><b>Quoting The Dandelion Rapist:</b>" What makes him an odd ball OP ? ... [snip!] ... have found neighbors pets dead in their backyard with toys, sticks, rocks stuck through them.... He just gives me the creeps.."


From the little you have written, I'd put big money on the liklihod that he has been or is being abused or that he has been signficantly traumatized.
And, if the parents are negligent, I'd say SOMEONE in the community should flag this kid and family with "the authorities."

*~*allykat*~* 1 child; Washington 891 posts
21st Jan '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting TheNuge:</b>" From the little you have written, I'd put big money on the liklihod that he has been or is being abused ... [snip!] ... And, if the parents are negligent, I'd say SOMEONE in the community should flag this kid and family with "the authorities.""</blockquote>




The school has. They won't let him back in the school at the moment. I know he has been suspended more than once, not sure what the other things were, but he got suspended during that classroom discussion because he wouldn't stop obsessing with how each student died and scared the other kids..

The Dandelion Rapist 18 kids; New Mexico 6885 posts
21st Jan '13
Quoting *~*allykat*~*:" <blockquote><b>Quoting TheNuge:</b>" From the little you have written, I'd put big ... [snip!] ... during that classroom discussion because he wouldn't stop obsessing with how each student died and scared the other kids.."


This doesn't add up. Or maybe I missed something ? :?



A suspension isn't alerting the authorities.
If the parents didn't care, why would they bring the discussion up in the first place ?



Perhaps someone should educate his parents. Someone needs to do something about his behavior.




Many studies in psychology, sociology, and criminology during the last 25 years have demonstrated that violent offenders frequently have childhood and adolescent histories of serious and repeated animal cruelty. The FBI has recognized the connection since the 1970s, when its analysis of the lives of serial killers suggested that most had killed or tortured animals as children. Other research has shown consistent patterns of animal cruelty among perpetrators of more common forms of violence, including child abuse, spouse abuse, and elder abuse. In fact, the American Psychiatric Association considers animal cruelty one of the diagnostic criteria of conduct disorder.
If you break it down to its bare essentials:



"Abusing an animal is a way for a human to find power/joy/fulfillment through the torture of a victim they know cannot defend itself."


Now break down a human crime, say rape. If we substitute a few pronouns, it's the SAME THING.
"Rape is a way for a human to find power/joy/fulfillment through the torture of a victim they know cannot defend themselves."


Now try it with, say, domestic abuse such as child abuse or spousal abuse:
"Child abuse is a way for a human to find power/joy/fulfillment through the torture of a victim they know cannot defend themselves."
Do you see the pattern here?


The line separating an animal abuser from someone capable of committing human abuse is much finer than most people care to consider. People abuse animals for the same reasons they abuse people. Some of them will stop with animals, but enough have been proven to continue on to commit violent crimes to people that it's worth paying attention to.



Virtually every serious violent offender has a history of animal abuse in their past, and since there's no way to know which animal abuser is going to continue on to commit violent human crimes, they should ALL be taken that seriously. FBI Supervisory Special Agent Allen Brantley was quoted as saying "Animal cruelty... is not a harmless venting of emotion in a healthy individual; this is a warning sign..." It should be looked at as exactly that. Its a clear indicator of psychological issues that can and often DO lead to more violent human crimes.



Dr. Randall Lockwood, who has a doctorate in psychology and is senior vice president for anti-cruelty initiatives and training for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, states "A kid who is abusive to a pet is quite often acting out violence directly experienced or witnessed in the home," Lockwood said, adding that about one-third of children who are exposed to family violence will act out this violence, often against their own pets.



Others either abuse pets or threaten to abuse them as a way to control an individual.
"So much of animal cruelty... is really about power or control," Lockwood said. Often, aggression starts with a real or perceived injustice. The person feels powerless and develops a warped sense of self-respect. Eventually they feel strong only by being able to dominate a person or animal.



Sometimes, young children and those with developmental disabilities who harm animals don't understand what they're doing, Lockwood said. And animal hoarding - the practice of keeping dozens of animals in deplorable conditions - often is a symptom of a greater mental illness, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Just as in situations of other types of abuse, a victim of abuse often becomes a perpetrator. According to Lockwood, when women abuse animals, they "almost always have a history of victimization themselves. That's where a lot of that rage comes from."
In domestic violence situations, women are often afraid to leave the home out of fear the abuser will harm the family pet, which has lead to the creation of Animal Safehouse programs, which provide foster care for the pets of victims in domestic violence situations, empowering them to leave the abusive situation and get help.
Whether a teenager shoots a cat without provocation or an elderly woman is hoarding 200 cats in her home, "both are exhibiting mental health issues... but need very different kinds of attention," Lockwood said.



Those who abuse animals for no obvious reason, Lockwood said, are "budding psychopaths." They have no empathy and only see the world as what it's going to do for them.
History is full of high-profile examples of this connection:



  • Patrick Sherrill, who killed 14 coworkers at a post office and then shot himself, had a history of stealing local pets and allowing his own dog to attack and mutilate them.
  • Earl Kenneth Shriner, who raped, stabbed, and mutilated a 7-year-old boy, had been widely known in his neighborhood as the man who put firecrackers in dogs? rectums and strung up cats.
  • Brenda Spencer, who opened fire at a San Diego school, killing two children and injuring nine others, had repeatedly abused cats and dogs, often by setting their tails on fire.
  • Albert DeSalvo, the "Boston Strangler" who killed 13 women, trapped dogs and cats in orange crates and shot arrows through the boxes in his youth.
  • Carroll Edward Cole, executed for five of the 35 murders of which he was accused, said his first act of violence as a child was to strangle a puppy.
  • In 1987, three Missouri high school students were charged with the beating death of a classmate. They had histories of repeated acts of animal mutilation starting several years earlier. One confessed that he had killed so many cats he?d lost count. Two brothers who murdered their parents had previously told classmates that they had decapitated a cat.
  • Serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer had impaled dogs? heads, frogs, and cats on sticks.


More recently, high school killers such as 15-year-old Kip Kinkel in Springfield, Ore., and Luke Woodham, 16, in Pearl, Miss., tortured animals before embarking on shooting sprees. Columbine High School students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, who shot and killed 12 classmates before turning their guns on themselves, bragged about mutilating animals to their friends.



As powerful a statement as the high-profile examples above make, they don't even begin to scratch the surface of the whole truth behind the abuse connection. Learning more about the animal cruelty/interpersonal violence connection is vital for community members and law enforcement alike.



http://www.pet-abuse.com/pages/abuse_connection.php

*~*allykat*~* 1 child; Washington 891 posts
21st Jan '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting The Dandelion Rapist:</b>" This doesn't add up. Or maybe I missed something ? :? A suspension isn't alerting the authorities. ... [snip!] ... connection is vital for community members and law enforcement alike. http://www.pet-abuse.com/pages/abuse_connection.php"</blockquote>




They suspended him and alerted the local cops. He had a meeting with an officer (his mom didn't show up for the meeting)

TheNuge 1 child; Pennsylvania 22820 posts
21st Jan '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting *~*allykat*~*:</b>" <blockquote><b>Quoting The Dandelion Rapist:</b>" This doesn't add up. Or maybe I ... [snip!] ... They suspended him and alerted the local cops. He had a meeting with an officer (his mom didn't show up for the meeting)"</blockquote>




Hopefully the fact that the mom didn't show up made this kid and the situation a bigger red flag. My guess is that they will uncover some sordid, disgusting abuse.
I believe there is pure evil in this world, but this kids problem were probably created by his situation. He may not be hopeless but he is certainly going to need a lot of intervention.

The Dandelion Rapist 18 kids; New Mexico 6885 posts
21st Jan '13
Quoting TheNuge:" <blockquote><b>Quoting *~*allykat*~*:</b>" <blockquote><b>Quoting The Dandelion ... [snip!] ... were probably created by his situation. He may not be hopeless but he is certainly going to need a lot of intervention."


I completely agree. I really hope this kid gets the help he needs in order to function in society without becoming a danger. It breaks my heart when parents don't pay enough attention to either recognize this behavior, or they just don't seem to care.

TheNuge 1 child; Pennsylvania 22820 posts
21st Jan '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting The Dandelion Rapist:</b>" I completely agree. I really hope this kid gets the help he needs in order to function in society without ... [snip!] ... It breaks my heart when parents don't pay enough attention to either recognize this behavior, or they just don't seem to care. "</blockquote>




Or, they are actively contributing to the problem and don't want to be caught. It's a heartbreaking situation for the kid, but enraging regarding the parents.
Like I said before, I'd be big money on abuse. The parents probably know about it but don't wish to deal with the real-life consequences. It's too bad that they are willing to sacrifice their son.

The Dandelion Rapist 18 kids; New Mexico 6885 posts
21st Jan '13
Quoting TheNuge:" <blockquote><b>Quoting The Dandelion Rapist:</b>" I completely agree. I really hope ... [snip!] ... about it but don't wish to deal with the real-life consequences. It's too bad that they are willing to sacrifice their son."


That's true. The abuse thing crossed my mind, but I think I was more disturbed by the animal cruelty thing to actually give more thought to it. I completely agree with what you said though.



There are countless things that can lead up to that kind of behavior in a child. I mean you and I can both be wrong, and the child can just be acting out for attention. OP did say the parents don't really acknowledge the child, and lets him do whatever he wants. There's really no telling, but the abuse/neglect thing does make sense.



Out of curiosity, can't the parents get into some form of trouble because they didn't show up to that meeting? I mean the meeting was for the best interest of the child, and I would imagine not addressing violent behavior issues for correction is some form of negligence? (My opinion anyways).