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Amelia [27 wks] Due July 20 (boy); 4 angel babies; Tallahassee, Florida 14387 posts
24th Jan '13

Year round schooling does NOT mean more school. I have never heard of a year round school that actually increases the number of days in each school year.

The Monk Nerima, Japan 723 posts
24th Jan '13

The first thing that needs to be addressed before this could even be possible is funding. How to better fund our schools so that children are able to receive an individualized and meaningful education? I seriously worked in one of the smaller schools in my district and just because we didn't have a large student body we got jack doolitle squat!

Amelia [27 wks] Due July 20 (boy); 4 angel babies; Tallahassee, Florida 14387 posts
24th Jan '13
Quoting Piyo Piyo:" The first thing that needs to be addressed before this could even be possible is funding. How to better ... [snip!] ... in one of the smaller schools in my district and just because we didn't have a large student body we got jack doolitle squat!"


Students who are behind could use part of their frequent breaks to get more time with teachers. Teachers would volunteer and be paid for this just as in summer school. This type of remediation would be far more beneficial for struggling students than would traditional summer school.

I'm His Amy He's My Rory 2 kids; Caldwell, Idaho 49251 posts
24th Jan '13
Quoting The Doctor:" Absolutely. It's fascinating the amount of blamet that's put on a teacher now for a child not doing ... [snip!] ... responsibility, not the teacher's. I also have a huge issue with standardized testing being the be-all end-all of "success"."


And the parents that think education should be left completely to the school system. It's sickening. If you don't plan on teaching a child, don't have one.

Amelia [27 wks] Due July 20 (boy); 4 angel babies; Tallahassee, Florida 14387 posts
24th Jan '13
Quoting I'm His Amy He's My Rory:" And the parents that think education should be left completely to the school system. It's sickening. If you don't plan on teaching a child, don't have one."


I agree. Ultimately a child's education is the responsibility of the parent. Although they are the only ones who are never held accountable.

The Monk Nerima, Japan 723 posts
24th Jan '13
Quoting Amelia Margaret:" Students who are behind could use part of their frequent breaks to get more time with teachers. Teachers ... [snip!] ... school. This type of remediation would be far more beneficial for struggling students than would traditional summer school."

I would agree with. I would personally just volunteer my time to work with students. But I was a Life Skills teacher and they really cut back on those students abilities to have summer school. They had to show serious regression before they would even consider summer school.

Nathan Young 2 kids; Syracuse, New York 57580 posts
status 24th Jan '13
Quoting I'm His Amy He's My Rory:" And the parents that think education should be left completely to the school system. It's sickening. If you don't plan on teaching a child, don't have one."


Absolutely. Parents need to be involved with their child's education, not blame the teacher for not poofing information into the child's brain.

Amelia [27 wks] Due July 20 (boy); 4 angel babies; Tallahassee, Florida 14387 posts
24th Jan '13

I'd also like to add that although transitioning a school from traditional to year round is a big change, it's way to greatly improve the quality of education and spend 0 dollars to do so.

Noneya Business Due August 29; 1 child; Pennsylvania 10739 posts
status 24th Jan '13

Idk how I'd feel about it for high school. Maybe middle school and lower. During the summer when I was in high school I made the bulk of my money to get my through until the winter when the ski hill opened. Some kids needs to work. I would be working probably above what I was supposed to because of child labor laws but I needed that money to have the things I needed. I know so many kids in my area that have to do that so they can actually focus on school during the year.

lolajessup Due July 25 (girl); 2 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44057 posts
24th Jan '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting I'm His Amy He's My Rory:</b>" I think this has a lot to do with it's now not "acceptable" for anyone to tell a child they've failed ... [snip!] ... to accomplish because it will be handed to them they give up trying because why work for something that will just be given. "</blockquote>



Not even just academics but punishment too. If the child era in trouble te parents are all up in the teachers face, blaming the teacher, blaming their friends, etc. my dd is in K and she got lunch detention because she was sneaking to the bathroom without telling the lunch aides with her friend and then playing around in the bathroom. Well the other girls mom told her she couldn't be friends with my dd cause she was getting her in trouble. Dd kept telling us the other girl was thenroovlem but instead of saying it was her fault we told dd she needed to be responsible for her own actions regardless if skmekne else makes a bad choice. Then they had a week of half days so the lunch detention was scheduled for the first mon back and we talked to her about it all week and web that morning how she had to have consequences for her behavior and make better choices next time. And they didn't even do the detention. I was so mad. I made SO go talk to the lunch aide and tell her she needed to be punished. But I assume most parents would have went in throwin around blame everywhere except their child. Teachers probably aren't used to parents who support their decisions.

lolajessup Due July 25 (girl); 2 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44057 posts
24th Jan '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Amelia Margaret:</b>" Year round schooling does NOT mean more school. I have never heard of a year round school that actually increases the number of days in each school year. "</blockquote>



:!: just taking the days they'd typically get off and spreading them throughout the year instead of in a block chunk.

I'm His Amy He's My Rory 2 kids; Caldwell, Idaho 49251 posts
24th Jan '13
Quoting The Doctor:" Absolutely. Parents need to be involved with their child's education, not blame the teacher for not poofing information into the child's brain."


Yup! You know my parents got us a computer when I was in 3rd grade. Wanna know what games I got? Math, language, etc. I was doing algebra for fun on these games before I was out of 3rd grade. I was also reading at 2nd year of college level by 4th grade. I'm guilty of slacking too so far, I don't read to Rory as much as I should and we just play mostly. I'm not always pointing out colors and shapes. I will start once I can get his attention a bit better though. I can't even get him to sit still for 2-3 minutes to finish a quick board book lol

lolajessup Due July 25 (girl); 2 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44057 posts
24th Jan '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Amelia Margaret:</b>" I agree. Ultimately a child's education is the responsibility of the parent. Although they are the only ones who are never held accountable."</blockquote>



I agree. I send my dd to school not just to learn. I am certain if she didn't step into a school shed still learn because I would teach her. I do teach her. It just helps her to have school validate it or show her in a diff way to help her understand more thoroughly. But either way school or not shed still be learning just as much because I am her mother and i feel it's my responsibility to teach her.

Nathan Young 2 kids; Syracuse, New York 57580 posts
status 24th Jan '13
Quoting I'm His Amy He's My Rory:" Yup! You know my parents got us a computer when I was in 3rd grade. Wanna know what games I got? Math, ... [snip!] ... I can get his attention a bit better though. I can't even get him to sit still for 2-3 minutes to finish a quick board book lol"


Haha! It will come in time. Have you tried just reading him stuff as he plays? :)



DD was the same way, now she loves reading (when she's getting ready for bed). During the day... forget it. Too busy! haha

lolajessup Due July 25 (girl); 2 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44057 posts
24th Jan '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting I'm His Amy He's My Rory:</b>" Yup! You know my parents got us a computer when I was in 3rd grade. Wanna know what games I got? Math, ... [snip!] ... I can get his attention a bit better though. I can't even get him to sit still for 2-3 minutes to finish a quick board book lol"</blockquote>



Don't feel bad. You'll make him hate learning unless he's interested. You just have to follow his cues of interest and readiness and introduce it when he shows those signs. Otherwise you'll drive him and yourself nuts.