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3 week old baby drinking cows milk?? Update on pg6 Im gone Due September 22 (boy); New York 3576 posts
10th Jun '08

I did not do this first off



My sil is kind of a dumbass she has a 3 week old son and she calls me today asking if i can run her to the store to pick up formula.. Sure no problem.. On the way she tells me she ran out 2 days ago i freak " HOW HAVE YOU BEEN FEEDING PAYTIN??? shes been giving him skim milk and when we where at the store she only got 1 can of formula and a few gallons of milk she says she is going to wean him off formula and onto milk cause its cheaper.. Am i mistaken or is this a really bad idea ?
Somone tell me please ?
Im gonna print off your guys feed back and give it to her

~@ng3l@~ 17 kids; Abilene, Texas 1589 posts
10th Jun '08

From what I understand, you are NOT supposed to give a baby cows milk until they are 1 year or dr pre-approves. Its bad on their tummies.

*^*^*^*^* 15 kids; Ohio 4597 posts
10th Jun '08

Go to WIC and pick up some information for her. Then she'll get her milk and formula free.

Hipster 1 child; Lithuania 42435 posts
10th Jun '08

Cow's milk is not until one year and even then I would be whole milk. Your SIL is beyond retarded.

*Mellow* 3 kids; York, Pennsylvania 17689 posts
10th Jun '08

They can't digest cow's milk at that young age. It could make him have a serious reaction. There's been studies that cow's milk at an early age can cause asthma. The list can go on and on. Get WIC or find help for formula if you can't afford it (your sil)!

absolute Simpsonville, Kentucky 6535 posts
10th Jun '08

A very very bad idea. Formula had vitimans and nutrition that a baby needs. Plus babies intestines and such are not developed enough to handle cows milk. Your friend is dumb IMO.
If she can't afford it, get on WIC.

EastonsMom TTC since Feb 2014; 1 child; Winston-Salem, North Carolina 30915 posts
10th Jun '08

Doctors generally recommend that you do not give cow's milk to infants 12 months old or younger. For babies, cow's milk is difficult to digest and does not provide enough nutrition.

Mrs.McK 34 kids; Massachusetts 104 posts
10th Jun '08

NOOOOOO!!!!! Babys can not have cow's milk until they are a year old!! OMG I hope she doesn't really try to do this, it is so dangerous for the baby. Is there WIC where you are? they will help with formula. Tell her to check with the pediatrician, they will help her with samples also.

Monica♥YASDYARDFR 17 kids; Beverly Hills, California 57063 posts
10th Jun '08

That poor baby!! I can afford his formula let me have him!

MizWiz 3 kids; Alberta 745 posts
10th Jun '08

Babies do not get enough of their daily nutritional requirments in cows milk. My Dr. told me that the reason they wait until 1 yr for cows milk is because this is about the time when your child eats more table food and gets enough nutrition that you no longer need to suppliment with formula. You SIL should definately not go to cows milk !!!!

EastonsMom TTC since Feb 2014; 1 child; Winston-Salem, North Carolina 30915 posts
10th Jun '08

A baby under one-year-old should be drinking neither soy milk nor cow's milk, but rather should be drinking breastmilk or a formula that can be either soy based or dairy based.
Most pediatricians recommend a dairy based formula for infants because it more closely matches breastmilk. Both formulas will provide comparable nutrition because they are required to meet strict government standards regarding nutrient levels.
Soy formulas are prescribed for baby's with a dairy allergy (or potential dairy allergy), lactose intolerance, or digestive upset from dairy formula. Soy is as potentially allergenic as is cow's milk and some babies are allergic to both in which case a hypoallergenic formula is required.
Soy contains hormone-like compounds called phytoestrogens. These compounds are currently under debate and researchers are trying to determine what effect, if any, they may have on a baby.
Once a baby turns one-year-old, and has progressed to table foods, the choice between soy milk and dairy milk is an individual matter. If a child is allergic to milk, is lactose intolerant or for some reason cannot tolerate or dislikes milk, or is being raised in a vegan vegetarian family, a soy milk is a better choice. However, it should not be lowfat, and it should be vitamin and mineral fortified. For most toddlers, cow's milk is generally a better choice because it is more nutrient dense and naturally contains more vitamins, protein and minerals than does soy milk. A one-year-old still needs a diet relatively high in fat. Milk is a big source of fat in an infant's diet, offsetting an expanded food repertoire that includes lower fat foods such as fruits, vegetables and grains.
Milk naturally contains a readily absorbable form of calcium, and has higher quality protein than soy milk. The ratio of protein, fat, and carbohydrates are also a good balance for baby. By one year, an infant's digestive track has matured enough to be able to handle the protein content of cow milk, which prohibits its use prior to that.
Glass for glass, you can compare soy milk to dairy milk for nutritional content:
Fortified Soy Milk (8 oz.) Cow Milk (8 oz.)
protein
fat
carbohydrate
calcium
calories
cholesterol
vitamin A
vitamin D
6 grams
5 grams
20 grams
300 mg
150
0
100 RE
2.5 ug
8 grams
8 grams
11 grams
300 mg
150
33 mg
92 RE
2.5 ug



Neither of these beverages promotes fat cell growth. Neither a soy based nor a dairy based formula will promote fat cell growth unless it is over consumed.
Ultimately, the answer to your question is individual and is dependent on the nutritional needs and restrictions, as well as the taste preferences of the child. Children have been raised sucessfully on both types of milk. end_slug.gif

*Mango Meli* 18 kids; United Kingdom 7046 posts
10th Jun '08

:shock: its not for babys under 1 , why else wouldthey be such thing as infnt formula if it was ok .

Im gone Due September 22 (boy); New York 3576 posts
10th Jun '08
Quoting AndeeLee:
EastonsMom TTC since Feb 2014; 1 child; Winston-Salem, North Carolina 30915 posts
10th Jun '08
Quoting Kadence's momma:
*Mellow* 3 kids; York, Pennsylvania 17689 posts
10th Jun '08

Look at this site:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002448.htm



Cow's milk is not recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics for children under 1 year old. Infants fed whole cow's milk don't get enough vitamin E, iron, and essential fatty acids. They also get too much protein, sodium, and potassium. These levels may be too high for the infant's system to handle. Also, whole cow's milk protein and fat are more difficult for an infant to digest and absorb.
Cow's milk can have dramatic effects on the infant's iron levels. Infants fed breast milk or iron-fortified formula have normal iron levels. Studies show infants often have low iron levels when started on cow's milk at 6 months of age.
For the best infant nutrition, pick the right milk source and eventually introduce the infant to solid foods. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be fed breast milk or iron-fortified formula during the first 12 months of life. Between ages 4 - 6 months, certain solid foods may be added. Breast milk or iron-fortified formula, along with age-appropriate solid foods and juices during the first year of life, provides more balanced nutrition.
Skim or 2% milk:
Under 1 year of age, skim and 2% (low-fat) milk have no place in the diet. They supply too much protein, potassium, and sodium and not enough calories for the growing infant. Children also need the fat for proper growth and development, including brain development.
Low-fat milk is not the answer for an overweight baby. The best diet is the same as that of a normal weight infant; the only difference is in the amount. Talk to a registered dietitian or doctor about your child's diet. Slightly reducing calories will allow the infant to "grow into his weight" without a rapid change in body fat. Rapid weight loss can be dangerous, particularly in a small child. Reducing fat too much might not leave enough energy stores for the infant to fight a serious illness. Many doctors question the serious, unknown consequences of a rapid loss of fat.