Reply
Speech apraxia Chibs 2 kids; Missouri 12147 posts
7th Mar '13

My sons speech therapist thinks he may have speech apraxia.
She wants me to work with him using his mouth and tongue muscles,blowing bubbles and using a whistle and things like that. To see if it helps him.
She is also going to try and get him in 2 days a week to see if more time helps.



If you have had a child with this how did you help him/her?
When did it correct itself?



Any tips or advice would be nice.
He's 2 btw

castaway 2 kids; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 19142 posts
7th Mar '13

My nephew had it. He was non verbal until he was 4, but you'd never know that now (he is almost 9 and speaks perfectly normal). He went through years of speech therapy to get through it.

Mrs. Curtis 1 child; Lompoc, California 1996 posts
7th Mar '13

watching! my almost 3 year old was just given this diagnoses last week. but they havnt scheduled therapy yet.. just having me work with him at home. they dont think our insurance will cover the therapist,



im looking for any ways to help him myself... right now we use flash cards and i make him try to repeat everything i say but after so long we both get so frustrated, but if we take a break he wont start again.

user banned 3 kids; Washington 15083 posts
8th Mar '13

My oldest was diagnosed at 27 months. He is 5 and has mild apraxia, he is not currently receiving speech through the school because he barely didn't qualify this year. However, his former SLP is currently his brothers SLP and she evaluates him regularly to make sure if he needs speech again he can receive services right away. He has a few words at age 3 and when we got his tongue tie clipped he started having good results with sounds and over the course of a year and a half really blossomed and you'd probably not believe he had such a moderate delay.



As for my middle LO he has severe Apraxia. He is 3.5 and we are trying to get him an aug comm device. (A tap to talk computer). He just had a standardized test done and he is more than 60% delayed. He tested so low they can't even chart or do age approximations for him. His other SLP said, she'd put him between a 6-12 month old in expressive language. He has been in speech for 2.5 years now. And although they think he will talk eventually, the guesstimates we have are 5-7 years of a computer for his main source of communication. He is very smart, at age level and above. Very social and loving.



And LO who is 18 months isn't talking, so I might have #3 with apraxia. I spoke with a genetic counselor after LO #2 was born and there were no studies or odds they could give me if it's a genetic disorder or not. But in our case, there has got to be some sort of genetic link.



I guess, what I'm trying to say, is every kid is different. Every child is going to be affected differently. And some will make progress faster than others, but they will get there.



My biggest advice would be to enjoy your child, don't feel like you have to get there in a day. Don't get so consumed with the therapies you lose sight of who you are as a mom and he as a child. It's okay to take a break and not be focused on speech all the time.



If you need anything PM me.

user banned 3 kids; Washington 15083 posts
8th Mar '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Deborah B.:</b>" watching! my almost 3 year old was just given this diagnoses last week. but they havnt scheduled therapy ... [snip!] ... him try to repeat everything i say but after so long we both get so frustrated, but if we take a break he wont start again. "</blockquote>




We only work on a few single words at a time... Right now, emphasis on the b,t,s. boat, bus, bite, bat and trying to get him to pop his lips for the p in pat.



If he gets frustrated, let him take a break. Up until age 3 speech is play based. Farm toys, animal noises, story books, baby dolls with simple speech. And at that point, it's usually 10-15 minutes of work, 5-10 minutes speech incorporated into play, 10-15 minutes of work and another 5-10 minutes of speech play and then it's all done. Audio timers are helpful, because when the bell dings it's a signal that it's time to be all done.