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Inclusion classes AKS♥ 1 child; Hollywood, Florida 3227 posts
18th Mar '13

Xander (my 4 year old) is in a special ed Pre-K program for children with developmental delays. He qualified due to his speech delay. He has made some progress since starting the program but I was afraid he'd be in that program for another school year because he doesn't start Kindergarten til next August (2014) due to his late birthday. On Friday his teacher called and asked if we were interested in putting him in an inclusion class next school year (this coming August). Has anyone else's LO been through this transition? I would love to hear how it went...

lolajessup Due July 25; 2 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44057 posts
18th Mar '13

If he's only in for speech delay and is most likely going to be released from special Ed in K do an inclusion class most definitely. I really don't agree with special Ed only classes anyway, I'm a huge advocate for inclusion. If anything it will help him get ahead further.

AKS♥ 1 child; Hollywood, Florida 3227 posts
18th Mar '13
Quoting lolajessup:" If he's only in for speech delay and is most likely going to be released from special Ed in K do an inclusion ... [snip!] ... agree with special Ed only classes anyway, I'm a huge advocate for inclusion. If anything it will help him get ahead further."

I agree with you. The teacher also said that she thinks putting him in the inclusion class will help him. Thanks for replying :)

☮[The Mrs.] FJB Due December 4; 3 kids; North Carolina 14335 posts
18th Mar '13

I personally do not have a child in a inclusion class but I do field study with kindergarteners and I will say that from what I see the children in inclusion classes seem happier, it also doesn't alienate them, and your son will probably socialize better and strive more.

lolajessup Due July 25; 2 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44057 posts
18th Mar '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting AKS♥:</b>" I agree with you. The teacher also said that she thinks putting him in the inclusion class will help him. Thanks for replying :)"</blockquote>




Yes It will. He's going to be around kids that probably have higher vocabulary and social skills than the ones he's with now so he'll blossom in those areas more so than he would in a class of kids who are delayed. I loved teaching inclusion. Idk how any district can separate them out. It's just not right IMO. The district I live in does only Inclusion for prek (when you're in grade school severely disabled kids go to a special school) and the regular special Ed kids k-12 are inclusion in the regular classrooms. My mom teaches 6th grade special Ed and they are Inclusion. She pulls them out only a couple times a day for reading and spelling because they are working at a completely different pace.



The district I work in has separate classes for special Ed. I absolutely hate it. I think it does no good for the kids, and is singling them out which I don't like. Kids that early should not feel separated from their peers because of a delay or disability. I loved working in a classroom where you could walk in and see children learning together, not general Ed here and special Ed over there type of scenario.

tooodles 240 kids; Thailand 5075 posts
18th Mar '13

When my son was 3 he started in a preschool program like that and has done amazing with it. Technically he doesnt have a speech delay anymore but I kept him in for the second year just to make sure hes prepared for kindergarten this coming fall. I feel inclusions classes are very beneficial for a lot of kids.

Sam H. 17 kids; New York 560 posts
18th Mar '13

inclusion is great! There is definitely a time and place for special ed only classes, but not for speech delayed. I'm a certified teacher in general and special ed, with a background in speech pathology, and inclusion is the way to go. He will be with his peers who are typically developing, which help develop language. go for it!

Mama Rice 34 kids; North Las Vegas, Nevada 11980 posts
18th Mar '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting lolajessup:</b>" <blockquote><b>Quoting AKS♥:</b>" I agree with you. The teacher also said that ... [snip!] ... where you could walk in and see children learning together, not general Ed here and special Ed over there type of scenario."</blockquote>



We have inclusion but for severely disabled (some non-verbal and not fully potty trained in 1st or 2nd grade) they are accompanied the majority of the day with their own special ed aide. I think inclusion is great unless the child's disability is so severe that it will hinder the teacher teaching the others (ratios SUCK here, they can have up to 35 without any help :/). I couldn't imagine having 30-35 kids and one of them being severly disabled.

Buzz and Almond Joys momm 2 kids; Albuquerque, New Mexico 12593 posts
18th Mar '13

Since he is only going for speech I see this going great for your child.
We just did my 5 1/2 yr old transition IEP and he is going to gen Ed 12 hrs and 18 he in a sort of self contained classroom and then we are working him into more gen Ed as he gets used to the changes.

lolajessup Due July 25; 2 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44057 posts
18th Mar '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Mama Rice:</b>" <blockquote><b>Quoting lolajessup:</b>" <blockquote><b>Quoting AKS♥:</b>" ... [snip!] ... here, they can have up to 35 without any help :/). I couldn't imagine having 30-35 kids and one of them being severly disabled."</blockquote>




Yeah we live in a small area so there's what's called an area school for the several disabled. They're able to focus more on self help skills and they can go until they're 26. If they're mentally capable they teach them life skills like budgeting laundry etc. it really just depends on how severe they are. There's some that are basically in a vegetative state then there's some who are mentally not able to go to a normal classroom. Like my cousin. She went there until she aged out. She was at the mentality of a 2-3yo. So she worked on things like you would in preschool. Self help skills, socializing, independence. Our small schools don't have the room or staffing to take in these types of programs. So they created the area school where 5 different school districts go. It's properly staffed by well trained and educated staff so it works out for everyone's best interest really. This is the only time I think complete special Ed only is ok. Of course I'm not opposed to them being inclusion in a public school too. But it doesn't work for every area or school. My SOs school district was all inclusion even for severely disabled as well. But they were a much more wealthy and larger district.

AKS♥ 1 child; Hollywood, Florida 3227 posts
18th Mar '13

.Thanks ladies! I am so happy reading everyone's positive responses. His teacher said she was going to send home a paper today with the two schools that do the inclusion program so we can go there and see which one we like best. That's the only bummer that he will have to leave the school he's at now :( but both of the other schools are in the area, literally minutes away from our home