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Unimaginative 5 year old Mama Rice 34 kids; North Las Vegas, Nevada 11980 posts
23rd Apr '13

My 5 year old DD has no imagination, she never has. She has always needed someone to entertain her. We have tried numerous things to encourage her to be able to play on her own. Her brother is very imaginative, he found a sock yesterday and was using it to eat cars. He did that for a good 20 minutes. LOL



Is there anything I can do to help her become more imaginative?

user banned 21 kids; North Dakota 3800 posts
23rd Apr '13

There aren't any other concerns with her, are there? DS showed no imagination and we thought it was odd but after DD showed a lot more imagination we had him evaluated. Turns out he has high functioning autism. There were other small things we noticed but never anything that would have made me worry. Just throwing that out there.

TrixieGirl Due July 4; 1 child; Maryland 1175 posts
23rd Apr '13

maybe your child is just more logical?

Mama Rice 34 kids; North Las Vegas, Nevada 11980 posts
23rd Apr '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting *Mayhem*:</b>" There aren't any other concerns with her, are there? DS showed no imagination and we thought it was ... [snip!] ... There were other small things we noticed but never anything that would have made me worry. Just throwing that out there."</blockquote>



No, she is in full day kindergarten and I talked to her teacher (at my request) and she said my DD just doesn't want to play alone.

Lisa Lyon Due December 3 (boy); 3 kids; Nashville, Tennessee 455 posts
23rd Apr '13

My 6 year old is the same way. Always never seemed to have an imagination like my other two do. But with him I think its because his brain is in override. Hes top of the class. Mathematics on a 1st grande level and reading at a 3rd. Hes in Kindergarten. I think some kids with little imagination are over analysing reality and the brain is just functioning on a whole nother level. If any of that made sense. Lol

Mama Rice 34 kids; North Las Vegas, Nevada 11980 posts
23rd Apr '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting TrixieGirl:</b>" maybe your child is just more logical? "</blockquote>



She is very science minded and dissects everything. We were watching the light show on Fremont Street once and while most everyone else (kids and adults) were watching with interest my DD was asking how they got the lights to change like that, if someone was doing it or if a computer was. I am so creatively minded (with no enjoyment of science or math) that I am just wanting to encourage her creative side to blossom too.

Gone 17 kids; Miami, FL, United States 15414 posts
23rd Apr '13

I would just keep imitating it. It's sometimes hard for some kids to do that on their own. I think a big reason of why I was so imaginative and able to play on my own when I was little was because under the age of 6 my Dad would constantly play imaginary games with me and made it so much fun. I still remember them so well

tooodles 240 kids; Thailand 5075 posts
23rd Apr '13

As a child I wasnt imaginative. I was ocd about doing everything like the adults did etc. But I wasnt around kids until I went to school so I dont know if that had anything to do with it. I was an overly mature and boring child.

Clk 2 kids; Dexter, Michigan 11925 posts
23rd Apr '13

If she likes science then get her a science kit and do it with her. Science can actually be very creative. I don't think there is anything wrong with a logical mind, my husband is one and makes money being one. It's just who she is, I wouldn't start labeling her or trying to make her something she's not.

Gone 17 kids; Miami, FL, United States 15414 posts
23rd Apr '13
Quoting Clk:" If she likes science then get her a science kit and do it with her. Science can actually be very creative. ... [snip!] ... one and makes money being one. It's just who she is, I wouldn't start labeling her or trying to make her something she's not."

I agree, although it wouldn't hurt to try to initiate imaginative games in a fun, laidback way, it's also great that she's already showing a talent with Science and you can buy some really fun science kits and games. I think Barnes and Noble and Michaels have some good ones

Clk 2 kids; Dexter, Michigan 11925 posts
23rd Apr '13
Quoting Anthony's Mommy ♥:" I agree, although it wouldn't hurt to try to initiate imaginative games in a fun, laidback way, it's ... [snip!] ... with Science and you can buy some really fun science kits and games. I think Barnes and Noble and Michaels have some good ones"


Amazon has a ton of them, good ones for little kids too. Our three year old loves science and has been working through a kit with me for a few days now.

Mama Rice 34 kids; North Las Vegas, Nevada 11980 posts
23rd Apr '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Clk:</b>" If she likes science then get her a science kit and do it with her. Science can actually be very creative. ... [snip!] ... one and makes money being one. It's just who she is, I wouldn't start labeling her or trying to make her something she's not."</blockquote>



I am not trying to say it is a bad thing. I just would like to try to encourage her to blossom in other areas too. Her daddy is very mechanically and business minded and also makes good money. I just would like to see her excel in more than one aspect. in school she does wonderful in math and science and reading, but she struggles with art and music. They had to do a project where they used pictures of animals in different colors to demonstrate color mixing and she couldn't let go of the fact that animals can't be those colors.

Mara Due September 27 (girl); 2 kids; San Francisco, California 38964 posts
24th Apr '13
Quoting Mama Rice:" <blockquote><b>Quoting Clk:</b>" If she likes science then get her a science kit and ... [snip!] ... animals in different colors to demonstrate color mixing and she couldn't let go of the fact that animals can't be those colors."


she's a little scientist already. there are principles that must be adhered to...



to help w/ the creativity, you have to work w/ her on the things she's interested in and letting her see how you can mess w/ reality.



for example, start w/ coloring a frog, right? then put a hat on the frog and say, "doesn't that frog look silly w/ a hat, what other funny clothes could we put on a frog? how about a pair of glasses?"



and when she gets wound up on how things are "supposed to be", remind her of movies / stories where things are magical / logic-defying.



ask her if she would like to be able to fly - let her imagination spring from reality based things. she'll eventually develop her own flavor of creativity that'll be more firmly rooted in reality than most, but still will provide her w/ more lateral thinking skills in the future as she learns to experiment w/ breaking the rules of what "is" vs. what's imaginable.