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Occupational Therapy? Japan 388 posts
2nd May '13

DS goes to OT for the first time tomorrow. What should I expect?

3 little monsters 3 kids; Olathe, Colorado 50990 posts
2nd May '13

If he has already been evaluated by the therapist they will do exercises geared toward strengthening his weak areas. My son goes for fine motor and sensory issues. She usually has him play in the gym area first pulling ropes, riding modified bikes, jumping around, stuff like that. It helps stimulate him and gives him some good sensory input so he is calmer and more focused during the second half of therapy which takes more concentration. For fine motor she plays games to help increase his hand strength and lately we've been concentrating a lot on finger positioning when holding crayons, eating, ect.



If he hasn't been evaluated they will talk with you about what he has issues with, what he can and can't do and probably observe him when they give him little tasks just to gauge where he is. I had a questionnaire I filled out also that was similar to the well baby ones you get at the Dr's office, just much longer. If you have any paperwork from the pedi bring it with you.



I don't normally go back with my son, his OT likes to work with him alone because he gets too distracted when I'm back there and won't work as hard because he wants me to help instead of trying on his own.

Japan 388 posts
2nd May '13
Quoting 3 little monsters:" If he has already been evaluated by the therapist they will do exercises geared toward strengthening ... [snip!] ... he gets too distracted when I'm back there and won't work as hard because he wants me to help instead of trying on his own. "


This is for an eval. I just got a copy of his developmental study that says he's 27% delayed in fine motor and 22% delayed in gross motor ( although he has psychomotor retardation) Do you think giving her those papers would speed things up some?

3 little monsters 3 kids; Olathe, Colorado 50990 posts
2nd May '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Jax in the Tardis.:</b>" This is for an eval. I just got a copy of his developmental study that says he's 27% delayed in fine ... [snip!] ... in gross motor ( although he has psychomotor retardation) Do you think giving her those papers would speed things up some?"</blockquote>




It would at least give them a good idea where to start! I'd bring everything you have. Our OT wanted to see all the paperwork to compare with her observations and know the exact areas to work on. It's a detailed study right? Showing all the areas tested and where he scored in each area before giving an overall score? That's all going to be stuff they will want to see. With my son she didn't agree with the complete assessment but it was very helpful because between the two we were able to come up with a completely accurate assessment. Especially after she got to know his moods and how he reacts in new situations. They had scored him much lower than he was actually capable of, he just didn't know them and wasn't willing to try as hard as he was with his OT once he was comfortable with her.

Japan 388 posts
2nd May '13
Quoting 3 little monsters:" <blockquote><b>Quoting Jax in the Tardis.:</b>" This is for an eval. I just got a ... [snip!] ... capable of, he just didn't know them and wasn't willing to try as hard as he was with his OT once he was comfortable with her."

It is detailed. It has a list of all that was asked of him and what he could and couldn't do.