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Cast Your Vote:

    • It should be available -- Votes: 55
    • It should no be available -- Votes: 4
Euthanasia Minion 3 kids; ., GA, United States 21802 posts
6th May '13

Do you support human euthanasia? Should it be an option to dying patients?



I think it should be.
Animals are able to have an end to their suffering, but not humans. Are animals more important than a human life?



If I were suffering with no hope of recovery I would want to go. I think it's a person's right to choose to die in dignity instead of drugged up agony. :?




What do you think?

user banned 3 kids; Los Angeles, California 54034 posts
6th May '13

Yeah. I'd even go so far as to say that someone who is severely depressed and has been for many years with nothing ever helping and just living in torment all the time should be eligible for it. I mean, I've never been depressed but I imagine that would suck as bad as cancer.

TheNuge 1 child; Pennsylvania 23132 posts
6th May '13
Quoting Minion:" Do you support human euthanasia? Should it be an option to dying patients? I think it should be. Animals ... [snip!] ... want to go. I think it's a person's right to choose to die in dignity instead of drugged up agony. :? What do you think?"


we already kinda do that. many people choose to not continue life-saving treatment and get LOTS of morphine. of course, the docs and people in hospice would never call it that, but it is certainly a merciful way of letting someone go and not prolonging death.

I♥RYLEIGH 49 kids; Windsor, Ontario 10437 posts
6th May '13

Depends if that person is able to make the decision on their own....

Cordelia's Mom 33 kids; Bakersfield, California 3685 posts
6th May '13

Definitely. I see my fiance's grandma dying with horrible Alzheimer's and I know it that were me.. I wouldn't want to be around. She can't get herself to the bathroom, can make food, can't remember anyone, thinks her husband is still alive even though he died 5 years ago... If a dog had dementia and couldn't even remember where his water bowl was or who his owner was no question about it if they'd be put to sleep or not.

Serial Mom ✄ 18 kids; Michigan 2690 posts
6th May '13

This is a hard question. There are a lot of things to consider.
How would it be decided who would be eligible?
There's a lot of room for error. Sometimes doctors make a grim diagnosis and the person ends up recovering.




Though I would be for it for someone who is in constant pain and medication isn't helpful. That is no way to live.

kthx. Due January 13 (girl); Cleves, Ohio 66885 posts
status 6th May '13

Yes. SO's grandma passed away on Thursday. She had been in the hospital since that previous Saturday. She signed a DNR, and said she wasn't NO medical intervention (she had congenital heart failure, a blood infection, possibly bone cancer, and kidney failure). All she had was a constant morphine drip.



The high dose of morphine caused her to be unconscious. She was unconscious for 4 days. The waiting was awful... we knew she was going to die, but waiting for it was fucking torture. My SO and his mom were at the hospital every single day/night. It would've been easier if doctor assisted suicide were legal. Because she was gone... it was just her body barely hanging on. We all would've rather her been "put to sleep" so everyone didn't have to sit at the bed side wondering if that was going to be her last breath, for 4 days....

Cordelia's Mom 33 kids; Bakersfield, California 3685 posts
6th May '13
Quoting I♥RYLEIGH:" Depends if that person is able to make the decision on their own...."


I don't know at what point someone couldn't make that decision but I feel like maybe if someone gets a diagnosis of something that they know will get worse.. maybe they can decide then at what point they want to go?

Vindictive 50 kids; Switzerland 30558 posts
6th May '13

I absolutely think it should be available.

I♥RYLEIGH 49 kids; Windsor, Ontario 10437 posts
6th May '13
Quoting That one chick.:" I don't know at what point someone couldn't make that decision but I feel like maybe if someone gets ... [snip!] ... someone gets a diagnosis of something that they know will get worse.. maybe they can decide then at what point they want to go?"


I mean... if someone's in a coma, someone else shouldn't be able to make that decision for them... like their children or husband/wife/parents.... but yes your suggestion would be good. Like if they DO get to the point where they are in a coma or something... and can't respond, then yeah, when they are diagnosed it should be an option

Minion 3 kids; ., GA, United States 21802 posts
6th May '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting TheNuge:</b>" we already kinda do that. many people choose to not continue life-saving treatment and get LOTS of morphine. ... [snip!] ... people in hospice would never call it that, but it is certainly a merciful way of letting someone go and not prolonging death."</blockquote>




Yeah, but morphine doesn't always help the pain. My uncle is dying as we speak and he has been on morphine for a while and he's constantly in pain. I knew of a baby girl who was terminal and was on constant morphine and she cried constantly in pain.



I don't think it helps like it should. I also worked in a nursing home with hospice patients. People were in agony a lot of times there, poor things.

one of each 4 me Due January 8; TTC since Mar 2014; 3 kids; Ohio 6210 posts
6th May '13

I think it should be allowed. Generally the person has to go through some sort of counseling first and receive confirmation from 2 doctors that they are going to die. I think it should be extended to maybe Alzheimer's patients. Like they had a declaration made up of if they got so far gone they'd want to die

TheNuge 1 child; Pennsylvania 23132 posts
6th May '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Minion:</b>" <blockquote><b>Quoting TheNuge:</b>" we already kinda do that. many people choose ... [snip!] ... like it should. I also worked in a nursing home with hospice patients. People were in agony a lot of times there, poor things."</blockquote>




More should be done for the pain. They should have been sedated.

The Master 2 kids; Perth, Australia 19989 posts
7th May '13
Quoting TheNuge:" <blockquote><b>Quoting Minion:</b>" <blockquote><b>Quoting TheNuge:</b>" ... [snip!] ... a lot of times there, poor things."</blockquote> More should be done for the pain. They should have been sedated."


sedation doesn't stop pain ... when looking at the brain waves of people in chronic pain under heavy sedation the 'pain' doesn't stop. They're still suffering ... just in silence.

TheNuge 1 child; Pennsylvania 23132 posts
7th May '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Destiel:</b>" sedation doesn't stop pain ... when looking at the brain waves of people in chronic pain under heavy sedation the 'pain' doesn't stop. They're still suffering ... just in silence."</blockquote>




True. But more can be done for pain like nerve blocks. Often not nearly enough is done.
Many, many people are helped to die comfortably. I think we should do more.
From my time working in healthcare I did see examples of people that should have been given more help in ending their lives.
Regulating it is very complex. I dont know how it can be done. I should learn more about the countries that allow it. Right now we do too much to prolong death for those that aren't making that choice.