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Cast Your Vote:

    • Great Idea -- Votes: 11
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lolajessup 3 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44071 posts
13th Jun '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Kacti:</b>" Ok. Forget about gender Instead... we categorize the children based on which learning style benefits ... [snip!] ... other 20 girls fit into A. Would you then be okay with having separate classrooms based on learning style/ teaching method?"</blockquote>



I've really been pondering this idea all night. I like it, I really do, but I'm trying to imagine how it would work :/ but the problem comes in that children can cross intelligences too. So they may be auditory and kinesthetic while another child may be auditory and visual. So how do we account for children who need two styles intertwined? I think we'd end up having to use multiple styles anyway.

lolajessup 3 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44071 posts
13th Jun '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Mom.to.PoohBear:</b>" My son will be attending an all boys private high school. There isn't a lot of bullying, even in the ... [snip!] ... from a single sex school and they aren't socially awkward. However, I don't know if public schools should be that way. "</blockquote>



Where is that school at? I didn't even know there were single sex schools in mi lol!

lolajessup 3 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44071 posts
13th Jun '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting drunk faith1:</b>" Right. Separating by sex feels like segregation to me. What if some study says black kids and white kids learn differently? Then should they be separated? It's the same thing IMO. "</blockquote>



Well in a sense they do. I hope this doesn't come out wrong but inner city kids do learn differently than suburban ones due to risk factors and life experiences. And what race is majority in each of those areas?

The Doctor 2 kids; Whiskey Dick Mountain, WA, United States 59959 posts
13th Jun '13
Quoting lolajessup:" <blockquote><b>Quoting drunk faith1:</b>" Right. Separating by sex feels like segregation ... [snip!] ... differently than suburban ones due to risk factors and life experiences. And what race is majority in each of those areas?"


...while different life experiences and situations can influence how someone learns... I find something very wrong with the way this came out.



Race is not what causes these learning differences, nor is it beneficial to think that race, in any way, determines how someone learns. Most people live in the city, despite their race, because of poverty and life circumstances. Not because of the color of their skin. And I'm sorry, but I find the "what race is the majority in each of those areas" to be just.... very backwards thinking.

drunk faith1 1 child; Alabama 10081 posts
13th Jun '13
Quoting The Doctor:" ...while different life experiences and situations can influence how someone learns... I find something ... [snip!] ... skin. And I'm sorry, but I find the "what race is the majority in each of those areas" to be just.... very backwards thinking."

I think she just meant that it 'could' be said that black and white kids learn differently because, statistically, more black children live in poor areas. Not neccessarily BECAUSE of skin tone.

lolajessup 3 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44071 posts
13th Jun '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting The Doctor:</b>" ...while different life experiences and situations can influence how someone learns... I find something ... [snip!] ... skin. And I'm sorry, but I find the "what race is the majority in each of those areas" to be just.... very backwards thinking."</blockquote>



I didn't mean race was what influenced learning styles, but that it ends up being separated by race between those types of schools, which is true that's why there is all the controversy with inner city schools and poor educational institutes. Majority of those schools are minorities unfortunately. But the question is are those schools tailoring education to that group of students or are they trying to use traditional styles of teaching that are "universal"?

The Doctor 2 kids; Whiskey Dick Mountain, WA, United States 59959 posts
13th Jun '13
Quoting drunk faith1:" I think she just meant that it 'could' be said that black and white kids learn differently because, statistically, more black children live in poor areas. Not neccessarily BECAUSE of skin tone."


Hm. Then I guess I just disagree with the concept that black and white kids learn differently. And such a broad generalization of "black-poor-city" and "white-wealthy-suburban" therefore different learning styles.



I dunno. Just something about that thought process doesn't sit well with me. I hope that makes sense, trying to articulate and it's not working on this rainy assed day. :lol:

lolajessup 3 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44071 posts
13th Jun '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting drunk faith1:</b>" I think she just meant that it 'could' be said that black and white kids learn differently because, statistically, more black children live in poor areas. Not neccessarily BECAUSE of skin tone."</blockquote>



Exactly. That's why I was trying to be careful how i worded it.

lolajessup 3 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44071 posts
13th Jun '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting The Doctor:</b>" Hm. Then I guess I just disagree with the concept that black and white kids learn differently. And ... [snip!] ... doesn't sit well with me. I hope that makes sense, trying to articulate and it's not working on this rainy assed day. :lol:"</blockquote>



There is a difference in prior knowledge which does change how a child learns. It changes how you have to approach something for it to make sense. For example, my mom teaches 6th grade and when talking about area and perimeter they only get it if she approaches it as fencing and grass because that's what they're familiar with. But would the same approach work with a child with no backyard?

The Doctor 2 kids; Whiskey Dick Mountain, WA, United States 59959 posts
13th Jun '13
Quoting lolajessup:" <blockquote><b>Quoting The Doctor:</b>" ...while different life experiences and situations ... [snip!] ... tailoring education to that group of students or are they trying to use traditional styles of teaching that are "universal"?"


I see, that was more clear. Thanks for sticking with me. haha



I think that's one of the huge issues with the education system is the complete disparity in funding for schools, directly depending on the wealth (or lack thereof) of the family in the first place.



And I think there's an issue with the (especially current) new regulations regarding "universal" test based education.



I was speaking with my good friend who is a 4th grade teacher. We went to elementary school together, and I was asking her what books they read.



She said that they don't have time to read full chapter books because they have so much they have to do that's passed down from above, and so instead of learning to enjoy reading, the kids are given 2 pages to try and read and regurgitate back to a multiple choice test. It's absurd, no matter if it's an inner city or a wealthy suburban school, IMO.

The Doctor 2 kids; Whiskey Dick Mountain, WA, United States 59959 posts
13th Jun '13
Quoting lolajessup:" <blockquote><b>Quoting The Doctor:</b>" Hm. Then I guess I just disagree with the ... [snip!] ... as fencing and grass because that's what they're familiar with. But would the same approach work with a child with no backyard?"



IMO, yes, because children know what a fence is. Just like I'm sure she could also use the concept of a fence and pavement around a basketball court, that both an urban and suburban child would probably know about, KWIM?



I understand what you're saying, that there are differences. But I think it's a disservice to say that because a child may live in an apartment in a city that a child doesn't know what a fence is, and that's where I think there is a disparity.



For example: I went to a suburban school. I had no fence around my yard growing up, but I still knew what a fence was. KWIM? Or I don't like to play basketball, but I've seen a basketball court in a park.

lolajessup 3 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44071 posts
13th Jun '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting The Doctor:</b>" I see, that was more clear. Thanks for sticking with me. haha I think that's one of the huge issues ... [snip!] ... and regurgitate back to a multiple choice test. It's absurd, no matter if it's an inner city or a wealthy suburban school, IMO."</blockquote>



That is VERY absurd :( poor babies. Testing is getting out of control. I had to take an assessment course and I learned about all these assessments they hve to do, my god, its overkill. And then plus the students who don't get any help at home how can they even keep up? Now there's a thing called flip curriculum where the students do the lecture at home, such as like a reading or video they can watch. Then they do their homework in class. I like this idea for older kids because I can't even tell you how many times I couldn't finish my homework at home cause I couldn't remember what I was doing or got stuck and couldn't get past it.



Oh and I'm glad you were able to understand what i meant lol :)

The Doctor 2 kids; Whiskey Dick Mountain, WA, United States 59959 posts
13th Jun '13
Quoting lolajessup:" <blockquote><b>Quoting The Doctor:</b>" I see, that was more clear. Thanks for sticking ... [snip!] ... what I was doing or got stuck and couldn't get past it. Oh and I'm glad you were able to understand what i meant lol :)"


I absolutely agree. Testing is out of control, and it's so boxed in to one type of learning, and one type of comprehension, which is really doing a disservice to kids, and they get completely turned off to learning and experiencing, reading.



She asked her 4th graders what they liked to read in their spare time, 12 out of 13 kids said, "I don't like to read" and the other said, "Twilight."



I've never heard of flip curriculum before! I'll have to look into that. :)

lolajessup 3 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44071 posts
13th Jun '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting The Doctor:</b>" IMO, yes, because children know what a fence is. Just like I'm sure she could also use the concept ... [snip!] ... up, but I still knew what a fence was. KWIM? Or I don't like to play basketball, but I've seen a basketball court in a park."</blockquote>



Maybe not the best example, but you know what I mean. Like if she was using farm references would city kids get that? Then the children who come from unsafe areas, that puts a whole new circumstance for teachers I work with. Children who are in fight or flight mode cannot learn as well as children who feel safe. That's brain research. Instead Of having children with the mindset "I'm at school this is safe cause my mom and dad dropped me off and I trust they'll keep me safe" there are children who have to start their day scared and that's an extra obstacle a teacher has to work through. He/she has to work extra hard to make those children feel safe and secure at school enough to come out of their brain stem so they are able to learn. I'm considering applying for a job at a city school right now and I'm very conflicted because that Is scary for me. I'm used to safe little small country town, and to go work where there's been 14 murders so far this year is a huge culture shock for me. It's not a place most teachers just jump on board to go teach in, so you know they're not getting the best teachers there either. Because I'm sure they all do what I'm doing and are apprehensive about even applying there.



http://www.neighborhoodscout.com/mi/saginaw/crime/

lolajessup 3 kids; 1 angel baby; Beaverton, Michigan 44071 posts
13th Jun '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting The Doctor:</b>" I absolutely agree. Testing is out of control, and it's so boxed in to one type of learning, and one ... [snip!] ... like to read" and the other said, "Twilight." I've never heard of flip curriculum before! I'll have to look into that. :)"</blockquote>




Awwe that's sad :( there has to be a better way. The problem is te teachers don't have a say. The school tells them this is hat you have to do to assess these kids. They're not all state mandated I don't think. I believe they just have to use some sort of assessment and the school chooses standardized cause its easier to track results over anecdotal notes and portfolios and such.