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Skilled photography ladies ... I need HELP. *e.j. {slytherin} 16 kids; France 2258 posts
12th Jun '13

Cutting to the chase: Is there anywhere I can find something like "Taking nice photos for dummies" ... Esp. with a Canon Rebel?




There are a lot of close family members who can't come to my brother's high school graduation events, and my mom has asked if my Rebel t4i and I can take *very nice* pictures of the day to show/send them.



I've only had this camera for 6 months and am still super wary of using it in moments where if I mess up, I can't do a re-take (ie: my brother getting his diploma).



These are probably the nicest photos I've taken to date, unedited .. And I've not taken any of people. Should I warn my mom that this is a bad idea and just bring a point-and-shoot? I don't wanna let her down :(



Sorry about the length. It's a dilemma.
(Rescued from my FB)
9t3486.jpg6z095y.jpg

taking a look at life Palm beach gardens, FL, United States 49101 posts
12th Jun '13

Id bring both if u can have ur mom take pictures with the point and shoot and u take them with the DSLR and then if something happens and they do not turn out great at least you have the point n shoot for back up

♀NoBoysAllowed 19 kids; San Diego, California 51862 posts
12th Jun '13

Well, start with your manual. Read it front to back twice. Other than workshops and classes, I'm not sure what else there is. I pretty much just learned things over the web the last couple years. The photog thread on here has helped me a lot, too.

Bonnie Beaver♥ Due April 9; 2 kids; North Pole, Alaska 18290 posts
12th Jun '13

Okay. First off, I'd get another lens besides the kit lens. Because they suck. haha



How close will you be sitting to him? Because depending on how far away you may need a longer lens.



And real quick basics.
Lower shutter speed (1/60-1/250) for indoors or really bright places.
Higher shutter speed (1/300-1/8000) for outdoors; sunny days. (I usually shoot anywhere from 1/1600 - 1/8000 on sunny days.



Wide f stop (1.4-3.0) to let more light in and get more bokeh.
Smaller f stop (3.5+) to keep more light out



ISO settings, I usually keep it on 100 outdoors. The only reason you need higher is if your shutter speed is getting too low. The higher the ISO rating (say 1600 +) the greater chance of noise in photos.




And for lenses, this would probably be your best best to get an up close:
http://shop.usa.canon.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_10051_10051_269492_-1



But as for portraits, these are my favorite lenses:
http://shop.usa.canon.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_10051_10051_269493_-1



http://shop.usa.canon.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_10051_10051_282308_-1



http://shop.usa.canon.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_10051_10051_269452_-1

MzDENISE 1 child; California 15379 posts
12th Jun '13

Pick up the book, "Understanding Exposure".
It's a really good book to help refine/improve your skill.

*e.j. {slytherin} 16 kids; France 2258 posts
12th Jun '13
Quoting Legendary Bonnie Beaver:" Okay. First off, I'd get another lens besides the kit lens. Because they suck. haha How close will you ... [snip!] ... http://shop.usa.canon.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_10051_10051_269452_-1"


Hot damn! That was detailed as hell, thanks!

taking a look at life Palm beach gardens, FL, United States 49101 posts
13th Jun '13
Quoting *e.j. {slytherin}:" Hot damn! That was detailed as hell, thanks!"


she knows what she is talking about i wish one day i could be good like her but that will never happen.