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Cast Your Vote:

    • Im Black, I chose formula from the get go -- Votes: 13
    • Im Black, I tried BF but failed -- Votes: 7
    • Im Black, I BF but supplement with formula -- Votes: 8
    • Im Black, I Exclusively BF (no formula ever) -- Votes: 12
    • Im another race, but like voting in polls -- Votes: 80
Slavery, Black Women, and Breastfeeding Taiter Tot's Mama *HOAR* TTA since Jul 2010; 81 kids; San Jose, California 31825 posts
10th Feb '10

I DID NOT WRITE THIS ARTICLE!!! So if you dont like it, don't take it out on ey. Im merely reposting this because it is more than D&D worthy.



Is Slavery Why Black Women Aren't Breastfeeding?
MONDAY, MAY 18, 2009



In the first of a series,Kimberly Seals Allers explores this phenomenon in search of answers.
When it comes tobreastfeeding, blackmothershave somehow lost their way. For over 30 years, African-American women have had the lowest breastfeeding rates, and though the numbers have greatly increased in recent years, black moms still have the lowest rates of all ethnicities. And when it comes to the gold standard of infant nutrition -- six months of exclusive breastfeeding -- among African-Americans, the rate is only 20% compared to 40% among whites. At a time when black infant mortality rates continue to climb to woefully high levels, momlogic andMochaManual.comtake a deeper look at why more black mothers aren't breastfeeding, and urgemomsto give their infants the healthiest start.



Slave Owners Purchased Us As Wet Nurses
To get to the bottom of thisbreastfeedingbusiness, it's important to go back. Waaay back. A long time ago, black women were notorious for nursing. In fact, slave owners used and purchased black women as wet nurses for their own children, often forcing these mothers to stop nursing their own infants to care for others. "On the one hand, wet nursing claimed the benefits of breastfeeding for the offspring of white masters while denying or limiting those health advantages to slave infants. On the other hand, wet nursing required slave mothers to transfer to white offspring the nurturing and affection they should have been able to allocate to their own children," writes historian Wilma A. Dunaway, in the bookThe African-American Family in Slavery and Emancipation, published by Cambridge University Press. And since breastfeeding reduces fertility, slave owners forced black women to stop breastfeeding early so that they could continue breeding, often to the health detriment of their infants, Dunaway writes.



slavery_pullquote.jpgBreastfeeding is for Poor People
But there's more to our story than breastfeeding interrupted at the hands of slave owners hundreds of years ago -- though many may argue that some vestiges of slavery still exist in the mindset of the black community. Aggressive marketing by the formula companies in the 1930s and 40s made formula-feeding the choice of the elite -- "the substance for sophisticates" -- white or black. And who doesn't want to be like therich and famous? That marketing continues to this day, down to the formula company-sponsored bag of goodies you probably received on the way out of the hospital. Then there's something I call the National Geographic factor -- that is, most of the images we see of black women breastfeeding are semi-naked women in Africa whose lives seem so far away from the African-American lifestyle and experience.
"'Breastfeeding is for poor people,' mymomonce said to me," explains Nicole, a 37-year-old mom from New Jersey, who breastfed two children for a year. "My mom is a very progressive woman, but this was the thinking of her generation. I couldn't believe it."


Breastfeeding Hurts and Takes Too Long
As children of that generation, many modern mothers don't have that breastfeeding legacy or support from their mothers, mothers-in-law, or extendedfamilymembers. And due to the oversexualization of the breasts, some women have forgotten or are even uncomfortable with using the breast for its actual intended purpose. Go figure! Others worry that their man will complain (please tell him baby comes first). Myths such as "breastfeeding hurts" (truth: only if the baby is not latched properly) or "breastfeeding is too time-consuming" (truth: whipping out a breast is a lot quicker than sterilizingbottles, mixing, measuring, or heating up formula) still linger amongblack mothers.
Throw in the economic pressures that put many black women back at work soon after delivery, and there's a "why bother" mentality that makes breastfeeding seem more like a challenge and a chore. The results speak for themselves. According to national data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, about 45% of African-American women breastfed their babies during the early postpartum period, compared to 66% of Hispanic mothers and 68% of white mothers who breastfed during that same period. Of African-American women who do choose to breastfeed, the duration is short, with many discontinuing in the first days after birth, their data shows.
"Before I nursed my son and daughter, none of the women in my family had ever breastfed before," says Kathi Barber, founder of the African-American Breastfeeding Alliance and author ofThe Black Woman's Guide to Breastfeeding. "But I decided change would start with me when I learned breastfeeding has health benefits for mothers and babies alike."


We Owe It To Ourselves and Our Babies
And while modern white mothers have reclaimed breastfeeding as hip and trendy, with help from outspoken and high-profile celebrity moms like Angelina Jolie, black celebrity mothers are still mostly mum on the topic. As a new generation of confident, empoweredblack mothers, we owe it to ourselves and our babies to give them breast milk -- the very best. According to the CDC, black babies are twice as likely as white infants to die before their first birthday. A 2001 study in Pediatrics concluded that an increase in African-American breastfeeding rates alone could reduce this disparity. To do so, every black motherneeds to become our own celebrity spokesperson (hey, we're beautiful with full lips!) to speak out and speak up to encourage and support breastfeeding in our own sister circles. It begins with you.

user banned Chicago, Illinois 66899 posts
10th Feb '10

LOL@ I like voting in polls. Anyway I'm black, I supplemented with formula with both kids but I did breastfeed. I will be exclusively breastfeeding this baby :)

BG's Resident Jew 1 child; Las Vegas, Nevada 6934 posts
10th Feb '10

I am shocked at the whole premise of this article.

Disappearing Meemz 15 kids; Indiana 88176 posts
10th Feb '10

I'm Black and FF, but it has nothing to do with a "slavery" mindset. It's because I was personally not comfortable with my kids getting my meds through my milk. Then my thyroid went kaput and made it even more pointless.

Elizabeth (mountainbaby) 1 child; McLean, Virginia 18837 posts
10th Feb '10

Stephanie....that last option should be "i'm another race but I really want to see the poll results"

Runαwαy Slave 1 child; New Orleans, Louisiana 65504 posts
10th Feb '10

Very interesting article.



IMO I can understand the first 3 paragraphs relating to black woman and not breastfeeding. But the 2nd to last one could relate to women of any race.



I am black, I did not breastfeed. I tried relentlessly but to no avail. I didn't get a supply of milk.

Happy Ipster Washington, D.C., District of Columbia 22228 posts
10th Feb '10

I think it's a beyond boatload of shit to say the aversion to breastfeeding stems mainly from slavery in America. That's retarded.



I'll even go so far as to say it's retarded to say slavery is ANY factor in why women CENTURIES later do not choose breastfeeding.



I think the other factors this article mentions covers it all: lack of family support, the need to return to work, discomfort from improper techniques, over sexualization, and the false impression it's a last resort for poverty stricken families.

♥Snooki♥ TTC since May 2010; 31 kids; Oklahoma 19860 posts
10th Feb '10

Grabs popcorn!

Beautifully Mixed! 1 child; Minnesota 4133 posts
10th Feb '10

I am half black and half white but i was raised around 99% black people. growing up I never seen anyone breastfeed. when i saw it for the first time in the mall as i got older i did think it was strange. I know that it is healthy for the baby but if your not used to seeing this it can be weired. I am not against it or anything it just was something that i chose not to do. IDK if slavery is the reason black woman do not breastfeed or not though. I do know a quit a bit of black woman around me that do breastfeed their children though. to each its own is what i believe!

Taiter Tot's Mama *HOAR* TTA since Jul 2010; 81 kids; San Jose, California 31825 posts
10th Feb '10
Quoting I ♥ Squishy:
Disappearing Meemz 15 kids; Indiana 88176 posts
10th Feb '10
Quoting Marquitta_proud mommy!:
user banned 15 kids; Shreveport, Louisiana 16680 posts
10th Feb '10

On the other hand, wet nursing required slave mothers to transfer to white offspring the nurturing and affection they should have been able to allocate to their own children


Thats SO fucked up, what kind of evil white people do that WTF seriously? :evil:

Runαwαy Slave 1 child; New Orleans, Louisiana 65504 posts
10th Feb '10
Quoting I ♥ Squishy:
♥Snooki♥ TTC since May 2010; 31 kids; Oklahoma 19860 posts
10th Feb '10
Quoting Runaway Slαvε
user banned 15 kids; Shreveport, Louisiana 16680 posts
10th Feb '10
Quoting Runaway Slαvε