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7 things your gynecologist wishes you knew

Every single woman out there has to go to a gynecologist at some point or the other of her life. However, there’s no denying the fact that it is an extremely personal experience, which may make you feel overly self-conscious or nervous during your visit. Although it is perfectly normal for you to be a bit shy when visiting your gynecologist, it also has the potential to hold you back from asking some very important questions or from sharing information that may be required for proper treatment.

When it comes to gynecologists, there is nothing new at all about your lady parts or your lady problems. However, even in current times, gynecologists complain that women still feel extremely shy and hesitant in terms of talking to them about vital health concerns. See the thing with gynecologists is that they look after women all through the different stages of their lives. And irrespective of your concern or issue, there is a good chance that they have already dealt with it before, so there is no reason for you to feel shy in opening up to her. So when you go for your next visit, you can assure yourself that your gynecologist wants you to know a few things, some of which are: 

7 Herpes is far more common than you’d like to imagine

That’s true. As statistics show, nearly 30 to 40 percent individuals test positive for herpes, even if they have no idea whatsoever about it. Now, herpes can be contracted both in the mouth and in the genitals. Back in the days it was believed that Type 1 Herpes is contracted in the mouth whereas the genitals are affected by Types 2 Herpes. 

However, considering the occurrence of oral sex, there is a good chance that one may have either type of herpes in either place. But the good news is that there are many anti-viral medications available these days that can be used to prevent outbreaks and reduce symptoms.

For those who don’t know, genital herpes is caused by the herpes simplex virus or HSV. The virus contracts itself as type 1 and type 2 or HSV-1 and HSV-2. The most common HSV infection known as oral herpes is triggered by HSV-1. Although it is rather rare for HSV-2 to trigger an oral infection, it is possible for both HSV-1 and HSV-2 to lead to genital infections. The worst part about both these viruses is that these can trigger infections in newborns as well.

Symptoms

With the onset of an infection, the patient may have painful skin lesions in the genital skin or in the mouth depending on the site of exposure. However, other individuals may start off being extremely ill with general symptoms including fever, headache, muscle ache and even painful urination. 

The virus tends to remain in the sensory nerve cells for life after the first infection, whereas the latent virus may reactivate, move down to the site of the first infection and trigger another round of skin lesions. The outbreak may, in this case, be fairly milder than the first episode. 

6 A low sex drive doesn’t always mean you have a hormonal problem

Many women bring up the topic of having low libido while visiting their gynecologist. Although they may think that the problem is associated with their hormones, it is most commonly associated with lifestyle choices and emotional issues. Except for menopausal women who end up having a decreased sex drive, not many women have a low sex drive due to hormonal issues.

There are many different reasons why you may have a hormonal problem. For instance, you mean not feel up to it due to relationship issues with your spouse, or maybe you’ve just had children and are overly tired. Problems such as these also lead to low sex drive, which means your hormones are not always to be blamed for this problem.

If you feel that your low sex drive is having an impact on your relationship, it is highly recommended for you to get in touch with a therapist right away. But for the record, there is nothing abnormal about you if you have a low libido – you are not alone and this problem is not as unusual as it may seem.

It’s a very common problem

Low sex drive is a fairly common problem that is suffered by many women at some point or the other in their lives. There are many different reasons, apart from hormonal problems, that lead to this issue. Its onset is also personal and professional stress together with life-changing events like childbirth, breastfeeding and a whole lot more. 

However, if this loss of libido lasts for a long time or keeps returning, it is necessary for you to get in touch with your health care provider as it can indicate an underlying medical, personal or even a lifestyle problem that needs to be resolved. 

5 You’re not the only one who’s lost ‘something down there’

No matter what it is that you’ve lost ‘down there’, there is a good chance that your gynecologist has seen something far stranger in there. So if something goes wrong and you end up losing something in your vagina, well, don’t hesitate – go to your doctor right away and let him or her sort you out. Instead of putting your health and safety at risk, it is best for you to take care of the problem and stop feeling embarrassed about it – you doctor HAS seen worse!

See, the vagina is basically a structure with side and back walls and when an item seems to get lost in there (or is no retrievable), it is natural for women to start panicking about it. When something of this sort happens, instead of looking up how to get things out of the vagina on the internet, it is vital for you to rush to your doctor right away. Doctors see things like this way more frequently than we’d like to imagine, and having to pull something out of a vagina is fairly normal for them – so stop hesitating!

Stats on lost condoms

Research studies have shown that about 28-33% of condom users report breakage, slippage and in some cases, both. In one study of 834 condom-protected sex acts, nearly 8% reported slippage during withdrawal whereas 7% reported slippage during sex. In both these cases, there is always the risk of having a condom getting stuck inside your vagina. If this happens to you, it is highly recommended for you to take an emergency contraceptive pill right away and get in touch with your gynecologist immediately so s/he may retrieve it.

4 There is no need for you to feel shy about your body

Let’s get the facts straight here – your doctor is just that – a doctor, a professional. Believe it or not, when your doctor looks at your privates, s/he is literally doing it as s/he would look at any other part of your body. There isn’t much that your doctor has not seen and just about everything is normal for her - so there is no need at all for you to be shy or afraid. However, if you find yourself feeling a bit shy around men, it is best for you to choose a female doctor. As a human, it is natural for you to be worried about your appearance, but doctors understand that bodies have variations. So all in all, there is no need at all for you to be shy of your body in front of a doctor.

Another thing that your doctor does not want you to be shy about is that of the number of sexual partners you’ve had. Remember, this isn’t something that your doctor wants to know out of curiosity or in a judgmental manner. S/he just wants to acquire this bit of information so she can work out the best healthcare plan for you. Women are at times hesitant in giving out this particular bit of information, but doctors ask this question to plan out your screening, thereby making it an extremely important query. And even when you give out this information, there is no chance that your doctor will remember it.

Doctors are not judgmental

Whether it is your body or the number of sexual partners you’ve had, the one thing that you can be assured of is that your doctor is not going to judge you for it. Doctors are professionals and they know how to keep bias and judgmental opinions away.

3 Birth control always has side-effects

Yes, you may find that one kind of birth control tends to work better for your body, but there is no such thing as birth control that does not trigger any side-effects at all. Every other form of birth control available these days (apart from condoms) has side effects. For this reason, when you start using a certain form of birth control, it is extremely important for you to let your body adjust to it before deciding whether it is working for you or not. 

For you gynecologist, if she had the power to tell you which form of birth control is right for you just by looking at you, things would be so much easier. However, considering they don’t know how to do that, it is vital for you to give things a fair trial.

Just so you know, it is necessary for you to use a particular form of birth control for at least three months before figuring out how effective it is for you. With that, you need to bear in mind the fact that even though your fertility is going to decrease with time, there is always the possibility that you will get pregnant until menopause sets in. But if you are over the 40 years mark, then merely using condoms as birth control will be sufficient for you.

The side-effects of birth control

Some of the most common side-effects that are triggered by the various forms of birth control are:

  • Breast tenderness
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Breakthrough bleeding etc.

2 Most women require foreplay to get in the mood

If you are the sort of woman who feels like ‘the only one in the world’ who needs foreplay and external stimulation for orgasm, well, there’s good news – you are not the only one and there is nothing wrong with you. See women are quite like ovens – it is necessary for them to be preheated. Research suggests that a majority of women out there need a bit of clitoral stimulation to be able to ‘reach the stars’. What this means is that you are not abnormal at all if you find simple intercourse not being able to make you orgasm – and this is something your gynecologist wants you to know too.

Another thing on your doctor’s mind is that you need to start feeling that your body is ‘important’. Not only is it vital for intimacy, it is also associated with your overall health. You need to love your lady parts to be able to enjoy your sexual as well as everyday life. Genital self-image is associated with your feelings towards your vulva and vagina. Through research, it has been found that women who feel fairly positive about their privates are more open to things like masturbation and receiving oral sex. Such women, it was also found, tend to feel much better about having their annual gynecologic exam, which means they have better health too.

Sex shouldn’t be a painful experience

Sex shouldn’t hurt. However, there could be multiple reasons for it such as infections and even needing lubrication. In case it is an infection, you need to be checked by a doctor so if you’ve been having painful intercourse for a while, go to your doctor right away.

1 You’re not the only one who’s lost ‘something down there’

No matter what it is that you’ve lost ‘down there’, there is a good chance that your gynecologist has seen something far stranger in there. So if something goes wrong and you end up losing something in your vagina, well, don’t hesitate – go to your doctor right away and let him or her sort you out. Instead of putting your health and safety at risk, it is best for you to take care of the problem and stop feeling embarrassed about it – you doctor HAS seen worse!

See, the vagina is basically a structure with side and back walls and when an item seems to get lost in there (or is no retrievable), it is natural for women to start panicking about it. When something of this sort happens, instead of looking up how to get things out of the vagina on the internet, it is vital for you to rush to your doctor right away. Doctors see things like this way more frequently than we’d like to imagine, and having to pull something out of a vagina is fairly normal for them – so stop hesitating!

Stats on lost condoms

Research studies have shown that about 28-33% of condom users report breakage, slippage and in some cases, both. In one study of 834 condom-protected sex acts, nearly 8% reported slippage during withdrawal whereas 7% reported slippage during sex. In both these cases, there is always the risk of having a condom getting stuck inside your vagina. 

If this happens to you, it is highly recommended for you to take an emergency contraceptive pill right away and get in touch with your gynecologist immediately so s/he may retrieve it.

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