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New Report Says Baby Snacks Have Unhealthily High Rates Of Sugar

A new study into the sugar content of snacks designed for babies has discovered that even those marketed as being healthy are often packed with sugar.

Cooking and preparing meals after a long day at work can be hard enough for anyone. Add a child or two into the mix and sometimes it can feel like an impossibility. Plus, due to the fussiness of kids when it comes to meal times, you can often find yourself having to prepare two or three different meals at the same time just to satisfy everyone's needs.

When you're on the go or simply overwhelmed with everything you are faced with, a snack suitable for your baby can be a godsend. Something quick to tide them over between meal times. Most parents want the best for their babies, naturally, so will seek out healthy snacks rather than chocolate bars and chips. However, some of those "healthy" snacks are just as bad as the unhealthy ones.

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via Abbott Nutrition New

Public Health England recently analyzed 1,120 different food and drink products aimed at children aged three and below, reports The Guardian. Its findings were pretty shocking. It discovered that almost half the content of fruit and vegetable-based snacks, which most parents would obviously assume to be healthy, was sugar.

One of the worst offenders was a product called the Kiddylicious smoothie melt. 4.1g of each 6g packet is sugar. That's a sugar content of almost 70% in something that is marketed as being good for children. The company that creates and sells the melts defended itself by explaining that since its product is made entirely of fruit, all of the sugar the melts contain is what naturally occurs in the fruit.

What is perhaps even more worrying is that some of the companies selling these products encourage them to be given to four-month-olds. Meanwhile, official health guidelines in the UK don't recommend parents start weaning their babies off of breast milk until they reach the six-month mark. Clearly, when it comes to baby snack guidelines in the UK, something needs to be done to make their packaging and advertising methods a lot stricter than they currently are.

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