www.babygaga.com

  • How Big Is Your Baby’s Stomach?

    Your baby’s first year of life can be one of the most amazing experiences you endure. In terms of feeding and appetite, knowing what to expect can help ease the anxiety every new parent feels.

    Many mothers can experience some uncertainty towards knowing how much to and when to feed their baby. This is completely normal. Feeding your baby can be a quite confusing part of new parenthood, which is why knowing the size of your baby’s stomach is one of the most assuring ways to distinguish as to how much food your baby really needs.Knowing this will also give you the confidence as you bond with your new baby and enjoy these first precious moments.

    To help you better understand exactly how big your baby’s stomach is and what it looks like throughout the first year of his life, we have outlined an easy-to-follow seven step guideline below. 

    Swipe to continue
    Use your keyboard arrows to navigate
  • 7 / 7
    The First Days

    During the first few days of your baby’s life, the size of his stomach is as small as a cherry. As your baby starts to grow, so too does the stomach, and at approximately five days old, his stomach will grow to be the size of a walnut.

    When should I feed my baby?

    Feeding in the first days of your baby’s life is important, especially because most newborns fall below their actual birth weight. It is expected that newborns will lose weight in the first 5-7 days of their life. In fact, a 5% weight loss is considered normal for a formula-fed newborn. A 7-10% weight loss is considered normal for those who are breastfed.

    You may be thinking, “Am I feeding my baby enough?” Newborns are preprogrammed to eat eight to twelve times every 24 hours, in other words, every 2-3 hours. Nursing babies, however, may eat more frequently as breast milk is easier to digest. Feeding according to these guidelines should keep your baby on track to reaching his birth weight by the time he is 10-14 days old. It is also important to note that if your baby loses a significant amount of weight following his birth, is sick, or is premature, you shouldn’t go too long without feeding – even if it means waking your baby. In this case, talk to your doctor about how often your baby should be fed.

    How much should I feed my baby?

    Whether you are formula feeding or breastfeeding your newborn, you’re sure to have some questions about how much to feed. In the first few days of your baby’s life, he should be consuming 2-3 ounces of formula or breast milk every 2-3 hours. Obviously this amount will increase as your baby grows and is able to take more at each feeding.

    Am I overfeeding my baby?

    Because a newborn’s stomach is so small, overfeeding can be a general concern many new parents have in the first few days of their baby’s life. Though overfeeding can happen, it is not as common as you think. When it comes to eating, babies have an incredible self-regulation system. Your baby will know when he’s had enough to eat and will refuse to feed when full. So when your baby turns away from the bottle or breast, he’s telling you he’s had enough. If he keeps coming back for more, then you know he’s still hungry.

    Overfeeding can happen more often in bottle-fed babies because it usually takes less effort for a baby to drink from a bottle. A baby who has taken too much of a feeding could likely spit up, so make sure to listen to your baby when he tells you he’s full.

    Here are some other general signs of overfeeding:

    • Weight gains are greater than the average weight for a baby of his age
    • Eight or more heavily wet diapers per day
    • Frequent sloppy, or foul-smelling bowel movements
    • Extreme flatulence
    • Frequent or large belching
    • Milk regurgitation
    • Irritability
    • Frequent sleep disturbance

    Swipe to continue
    Use your keyboard arrows to navigate
  • 6 / 7
    Newborns Who Are -  Weeks Old

    During the first week of your baby’s life, his stomach will have grown to the approximate size of an apricot. By the time your baby reaches two weeks old, his stomach will be the size of a large egg.

    When should I feed my baby?

    It is recommended that a 1-2 week old baby continue to eat every 2-3 hours, however, listen to your baby’s cues to see when he is hungry. Your baby will tell you if he needs to eat more frequently.

    How much should I feed my baby?

    As long as your baby continues to grow steadily, feeding amounts shouldn’t change too much. A 1-2 week old baby should be consuming around three full ounces of formula or breast milk every 2-3 hours. 

    Swipe to continue
    Use your keyboard arrows to navigate
  • 5 / 7
    When Newborns Reach  - Weeks Old

    Your baby’s stomach should still be the approximate size of a large egg. By this time, he should have reached and surpassed his birth weight.

    When should I feed my baby?

    During these first weeks, you should have some form of feeding pattern established. A baby that is between 2-4 weeks old should be continuing consuming around three full ounces of formula or breast milk every 2-3 hours.

    How much should I feed my baby?

    As long as your baby is growing and content, feeding patterns should remain the same or close to the same. 

    Swipe to continue
    Use your keyboard arrows to navigate
  • 4 / 7
     When Babies Reach - Months Old

    During these months, your baby’s stomach will still be around the size of a large egg, but you’ll begin to notice that he is becoming more active. Your baby may begin to move around more and you may even notice that he is becoming more vocal.

    When should I feed my baby?

    A 1 one to 3 month old baby should be consuming 3-4 ounces of formula or breast milk every 2-4 hours, however if your baby continues to eat at his 2-3 hour feeding routine, then there is no need to change his pattern until he is ready.

    How much should I feed my baby?

    As mentioned, your baby should be consuming around 3-4 ounces of food every 2-4 hours.

    Swipe to continue
    Use your keyboard arrows to navigate
  • 3 / 7
    Feeding at - Months Old

    Now is the time when you’ll really start to notice your baby’s progression and that he’s not so little anymore. Your baby will be eating more, growing more and getting stronger. By the time your baby reaches six months old, his stomach may still be the size of a large egg, but his eating patterns will have likely changed.

    When should I feed my baby?

    A baby who has reached six months of age has developed a more mature stomach and can begin to handle some solid foods. During these months you'll continue to provide the usual feedings of breast milk or formula, so if your baby refuses certain foods, don't be too concerned.

    It is also important to note that pre-term babies should be given some extra time before solid foods are introduced to them. Even though your baby was released from the hospital at 36 weeks, he is still physically four weeks younger than a full-term baby.

    What should I do if my baby refuses certain foods?

    Rest assured that changes in your baby's appetite are nothing to worry about and completely normal. Just make sure to be patient and keep at it. Don't ditch a new food if your baby spits it out, especially if it’s a healthy option. Babies may need to try a food a few times before accepting it, so offer it again a few days later.

    Always remember never to pressure your baby to eat, and never force an extra mouthful. This will likely make feeding time more stressful for the both of you. In fact, it could even put him off some foods completely.

    How much should I feed my baby?

    Solid foods should not be considered a replacement, but rather supplementary for breast milk or formula. During these growing months, your baby should be consuming 5-8 ounces of formula or breast milk along with the introduction of some solid foods.

    You can begin introducing solid foods if your baby has:

    • Doubled in birth weight
    • The ability to sit in a high chair and support his head and neck
    • The ability to open his mouth for when food is approaching
    • The ability to swallow food that goes into his mouth
    • A growing appetite – when he still seems hungry, even with his regular feedings of breast milk or formula per day
    • Shown curiosity about what you’re eating

    In case of food allergies, it’s important to introduce your baby to new foods one at a time. If you do not gradually introduce foods, you may have trouble tying an allergy to a specific new food. For example, if you give your baby three new foods over the course of a day and he develops an allergic reaction, you may not know which food caused the reaction.

    If you're introducing a new food to your baby, keep an eye out for these symptoms, as they can likely be types of allergic reactions:

    • Hives or welts
    • Flushed skin or rash
    • Swelling of the face, tongue, or lip
    • Vomiting and/or diarrhea
    • Coughing or wheezing
    • Shortness of breath
    • Loss of consciousness

    Swipe to continue
    Use your keyboard arrows to navigate
  • 2 / 7
    When Babies Reach – Months Old

    By the time your baby has reached this age, his appetite will have likely grown to handle some solid foods. By this time, your baby’s stomach is slightly larger than the size of a large egg and should be on track to growing even bigger.

    When should I feed my baby?

    Most babies of this age are completely capable of handling both the infant cereals and pureed foods that have been introduced as part of their diet along with breast milk or formula. At this time, regular formula or breast milk feedings should continue along with the introduction of these solid foods.

    How much should I feed my baby?

    Because solid foods are considered supplementary to formula or breast milk, your baby should still be consuming around 5-8 ounces of formula or breast milk at each feeding. 

    Swipe to continue
    Use your keyboard arrows to navigate
  • 1 / 7
    Feeding at Months – Year-Old

    Where has the time gone? Your baby is already a year old! By the time he has reached this age, his stomach will have grown to the size of a grapefruit. You’ll also notice that your baby’s feeding patterns have evolved. Before your baby’s first birthday, he’ll still need the essential vitamins and nutrients formula and breast milk provide. But at one year-old, you can start introducing your baby to whole cow’s milk as a replacement. It is important that you are using "whole" milk because children under two years old need the fat for brain development.

    If you’re breastfeeding and enjoy it, then you can continue for as long as you and your baby would like. Until both you and your baby are ready, there is no need to stop.

    When should I feed my baby?

    By this time, your baby will have moved from his infant eating habits, to a more adult-like pattern. To help set your baby’s taste preferences, make sure to keep introducing new flavors into his diet. It is very important for your baby to get the proper nutrients, so make sure to be feeding him 3-4 meals a day (no less).

    How much should I feed my baby?

    Providing your baby with the essential nutrients from each food group is important, especially as he continues to develop and grow. Below is a guideline of possible meal options of what and how much to feed your one year-old.

    • 2 cups of dairy (emphasize on natural sources of dairy, rather than processed)
    • 3 ounces of grain (with half of the intake being whole grains)
    • 1 cup of fruit (emphasize on whole natural fruits, rather than juices)
    • 1 cup of vegetables (cut into small pieces to avoid choking)
    • 2 ounces of protein: (emphasize on natural sources of protein, rather than processed)

    Though your baby is gaining his own independence with finger feeding, mealtime should be constantly supervised. Choking is always a danger, especially for babies, as they are just learning how to chew and swallow their food.

    Knowing the size of your baby’s stomach and how fast it grows can be very reassuring for first time parents. Building the foundation of your baby’s eating habits is a major responsibility, and as nutrition research always seems to change, deciding on what is best for your baby may take a bit of getting used to. Just remember, as long as you are making healthy choices, and your baby is growing content and happy, you can be assured that you have done everything right. 

    Swipe to continue
    Use your keyboard arrows to navigate
Swipe through the list Easily swipe through the list for a faster and better reading experience