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Study Reveals How Little Sleep New Parents Get

A new study suggests new parents only sleep for an average of four hours and 44 minutes a night in the first 12 months of a new born's life.

Anyone with a newborn is probably aware of this, but now, according to Independent, their woes are confirmed thanks to research conducted by Simba, a sleep technology brand, and they even ran the numbers to see how much sleep you'd miss over the course of an entire year. Interestingly, it adds up to about 50 nights a year.

These numbers are pretty staggering, even for parents of newborns, but when it's broken down even further, the plight of new parents is really highlighted. You'll probably lose 59 percent of sleep in the first year of your baby's life. Not only that, but mothers and fathers spend an average of 54 minutes in just trying to get their bundle of joy to sleep. At least you'll be getting some exercise, however, because the study revealed that parents walk around two miles while trying to rock their baby to sleep. That adds up to around two marathons over the course of a year.

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Via Parents Magazine

Being a parent is hard, obviously, but you're not completely hopeless when trying to make your tiny human fall asleep. There are some strategies to implement to help your newborn drift off to dreamland. In fact, we recently reported on a study from Michigan State University that suggests newborns who are less active during the day are more likely to stay awake at night. It seems like common sense, but there is quite a bit of science behind it all.

The study followed 22 six-month-olds who were in good health and focused on "tummy time" which is essentially an activity that helps babies develop basic motor skills. They found that babies who needed more feedings overnight and generally slept less were getting much less activity during the day. Not only that, but the babies who slept less gained more weight.

With that said, all babies are different, and each one will probably experience some sleepless nights. However, strategically planning feedings, swaddling, and being smart with light could also help.

NEXT: RESEARCH PROVES WOMEN WITH CHILDREN GET LESS SLEEP WHILE MEN REMAIN UNAFFECTED

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